Lighter Wines

bartenura
On the lighter side….

Post holiday lighter meals call for lighter wine but still wines that you can be excited about. Our friends at Royal Wines always have some great ideas for us.
“When I think of lighter wines I think of Italian wines – wines that are made to be enjoyed with food. These wines typically have a bright acidity that keeps them lighter on the palate,” says Gary Landsman, our chief wine go-to guy. Some of the wines from Ovadia Estates come to mind, such as the new Nobile di Montepulciano (local availability soon) or the ever popular Rosso di Motepulciano, each great deals at about $12-$16. The Morellino di Scansano & Dolcetto D’alba are also nice options (at about $20).

As for some nice white options, try the Goose Bay Sauvignon Blanc (everything from Goose Bay is great these days) and one of our favorites, the Carmel Kayoumi Riesling.

Healthy Cooking

Chanukah and Thanksgiving tend to run our schedules and our diets on overdrive. I think the most commonly searched recipes in the last few days were anything with the word “light” in front of it. I like to cook light but have been focusing more on healthy than light. Healthy food is filling, full of vitamins and minerals, fiber and great taste. Light recipes often use artificial flavorings like splenda to keep them sweet. So in an effort to improve overall health and still enjoy all of our food including dessert, I came up with a challenge, change one ingredient that will improve health and maintain the same great taste of a dish. You won’t believe the results! Seriously good food, no hint of anything missing, and improved health…now, you cannot beat that! Don’t forget to send me all your great one-fix substitutions so I can share them with everyone. And stay tuned next week for another great ingredient swap!

Pumpkin Bread with Sweetened Bananas
Chocolate Avocado Brownies

Pumpkin Bread Sweetened with Bananas

bananabread
Serves 8

Bananas are naturally sweet and serve as a good, non-processed sugar substitute in baking. They are full of fiber (sugar has none) Calorie-wise, you save BIG for this swap: 1 cup mashed banana is 73 kcal, for 1 cup sugar at 775 kcal.
They also contain resistant starch, which has been linked to burning fat. But because they contain more moisture than sugar does, make sure you use less milk or water when baking with bananas (about 3 tablespoons less for each banana).

1 banana, mashed (this is in place of 1 cup sugar)
2 eggs
1/2 cup vegetable oil (or coconut oil!)
1/3 cup water or soymilk
1 (15 ounces) can pumpkin puree
1-3/4 cup flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
Beat eggs and mix with banana (or sugar), oil, water, and pumpkin.
In another bowl, mix flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, nutmeg, cinnamon, and pumpkin pie spice.
Combine wet ingredients with dry ingredients until just blended
Pour into a greased and floured loaf pan.
Bake for 50 to 60 minutes.

Chocolate Avocado Brownies

Avocado-Brownies
Serves 10

The substitution of avocado in baked goods helps increase their nutritional value by contributing nearly 20 vitamins and minerals.
Over 75 percent of the fat in avocados is unsaturated (heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats), making them a great substitute for foods or ingredients high in saturated fat.

For avocado brownies:
2 avocados, mashed
8 ounces dark chocolate, melted
1 cup sugar
2 large eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 tablespoons coconut oil, or canola oil
3/4 cup flour
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking powder

Preheat oven to 350 degrees; spray 9-inch square pan with non-stick spray.
In bowl, mix mashed avocado and melted chocolate; mix in sugar, then eggs, vanilla extract, and oil.
Add in flour, cocoa, baking powder and salt until combined.
Spread batter in pan and bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until cooked through middle.

Equivalency note:
½ cup mashed avocado is equivalent to ¼ of a large avocado.

Giveaway: The Holiday Kosher Baker Cookbook

gv-kosherbaker
Paula Shoyer, author of the The Kosher Baker, has done it again with her new book, The Holiday Kosher Baker. She has already sold thousands of books and has appeared around the country demonstrating her unique creations and wowing people with her Kosher baking expertise. This book features holiday baking ideas from the classics and traditional items like rugelach, babka, and apple cake to updated and show stopper recipes like Salted Caramel Banana Tart Tatin (I made it last week, and it was superb), and Raspberry and Rose Macaroon Cake. A few things I love about this book, first the endless ideas for kosher substitutions for hard to find ingredients or pareve ingredients AND the incredible hints on how to make things Kosher for Passover (like converting flour to potato starch in a recipe while still keeping it light and tasty). And I especially like the Passover section filled with desserts that are good enough for all year round.

Not only did Paula include two sneak peak Hanukah recipes for GKC readers, Pumpkin Doughnuts and Almond and Olive Oil Cake, but she is also giving one lucky reader a free book just in time for Hanukah! Submit to win!

Paula is a friend of GKC and sat down to answer a few of our reader questions. I love it when authors and chefs share their secrets to success. Have more questions? Just email me and Paula will be happy to respond.

GKC: Paula, you are an expert baker. What is the secret to great kosher baking?
Paula: The secret to all baking is actually following the recipe and measuring. The secret to kosher baking is understanding all the of the great dairy-free ingredients out there that you can use to substitute for dairy ones. We are so lucky to live in 2013 with so many great options.

GKC: There are some impressive and “WOW” factor recipes in this book, are your books for advanced bakers?
Paula: No way! We all need easy options. Both books have recipes labeled “easy”, “moderate,” and “multiple step,” so there is something for every level of baker. The Kosher Baker has an entire chapter, 45 recipes, of super easy yet delicious and elegant desserts. The Holiday Kosher Baker has lots of easy desserts too about 35, but as we like fancier desserts for the holidays, the new book has many showstoppers for your holiday tables.

GKC: What is your go-to dessert?
Paula: From the new book, The Holiday Kosher Baker, I love the chewy chocolate and olive oil cookies – so easy and everyone loves them; and from The Kosher Baker, the orange tea cake from the cover photo.

GKC: What is your favorite thing to do with a flopped cake?
Paula: Plate it in the kitchen, add berries and a sauce or whipped cream, turn it into a bread pudding, or sometimes, if it is a total dud, it is labeled a “bake and dump”.

Thanks Paula, don’t forget to submit to win, and buy one too, it makes a great Hanukah present.

Available at Amazon.com for $24

To enter to win The Holiday Kosher Baker cookbook either:
1. Subscribe.
2. If you are already a subscriber, send us a comment. We love to hear your thoughts and ideas.
3. Follow us on Twitter or tweet about this post to your followers

Herb Roasted Turkey Breast

herb roasted turkey breast
I love this recipe by Ina Garten
Serves 8 – 10
1 whole bone-in turkey breast, 6 1/2 to 7 pounds
1 tablespoon minced garlic (3 cloves)
2 teaspoons dry mustard
1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary leaves
1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage leaves
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 cup dry white wine

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Place the turkey breast, skin side up, on a rack in a roasting pan.

In a small bowl, combine the garlic, mustard, herbs, salt, pepper, olive oil, and lemon juice to make a paste. Loosen the skin from the meat gently with your fingers and smear half of the paste directly on the meat. Spread the remaining paste evenly on the skin. Pour the wine into the bottom of the roasting pan.

Roast the turkey for 1 3/4 to 2 hours, until the skin is golden brown and an instant-read thermometer registers 165 degrees F when inserted into the thickest and meatiest areas of the breast. If the skin is over-browning, cover the breast loosely with aluminum foil. When the turkey is done, cover with foil and allow it to rest at room temperature for 15 minutes. Slice and serve with the pan juices spooned over the turkey

Mashed Potatoes with Sauteed Leeks

mashed
Serves 8

8 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
Salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
4 tablespoons margarine
3 to 4 leeks, quartered lengthwise, chopped and washed
Pepper
1 tablespoon lemon zest
6 ounces softened tofutti cream cheese or tofutti onion and garlic cream cheese or herb flavor
soymilk, for mashing

Place potatoes in a pot and cover with water. Cover pot and bring to a boil; salt water and cook potatoes until tender, 12-15 minutes. Drain and return potatoes to hot pot.
Meanwhile, heat olive oil over medium heat and melt margarine into warm oil. When margarine foams, add leeks and wilt 5 minutes, season with salt and pepper.
Mash potatoes with leeks, lemon zest, tofutti cream cheese, soymilk. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Bourbon Pecan Pie

pie
Serves 10

Yes, this pie has a slightly drunken flavor but its not overwhelming and adds a richness and delicious taste to an already scrumptious pie. It’s a great alternative to traditional pecan pie.

PIE DOUGH:
2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon salt
8 ounces (2 sticks) cold margarine/butter, cut into small cubes and chilled

FILLING:
5 ounces sugar
2 eggs plus 2 egg yolks
8.5 ounces dark corn syrup
3 ounces (6 tablespoons) margarine/butter, melted
1.4 ounces bourbon
3.5 ounces chocolate chips, melted and cooled to room temperature (but not hardened)
7 ounces pecans

EGG WASH:

1 egg, beaten
Splash of soymilk

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. 


For the pie dough:
Combine the flour, sugar and salt in the bowl of a food processor and mix. Add the margarine/butter cubes and process until the largest pieces are the size of peas and the smallest are the size of a grain of rice (or use a pastry cutter). Transfer to a bowl and slowly pour in 1/4 to 1/2 cup ice water, a few drops at a time, mixing vigorously with your hands in between pours; the margarine/butter and flour mixture should just come together. 

Divide the dough into two equal pieces, shape into discs and wrap tightly in plastic wrap. Let rest, refrigerated, for at least 1 hour. 

Roll one piece of dough into a circle just larger than the pie pan you will be using. Fit the dough into the pan, fold the edges under and crimp as you like. Put this pastry shell in the freezer while you make the pie filling.

For the filling:
Whisk together the sugar and whole eggs and yolks in a medium bowl until fully incorporated. Add the dark corn syrup, melted margarine/butter and bourbon and mix to combine. (The mixture should be completely smooth and homogenous. The margarine/butter will rise to the top rather rapidly if you let the mixture sit, but you can whisk it back together in a few seconds.) 

Brush the frozen pastry shell with the melted chocolate using a pastry brush, spreading it evenly over the bottom and sides. Scatter the pecans over the bottom of the pastry shell and pour the sugar and egg mixture over the pecans. 

For the egg wash: Mix the beaten egg with a splash of soymilk. Brush the sides of the pastry crust with the egg wash. 

Bake until the filling has puffed up and cracked and the crust is golden brown, about 45 minutes. All home ovens are different, so if the pecans start to burn, turn the oven down to 325 degrees F to finish baking, or tent some aluminum foil over the pie to prevent more unwanted darkening. You also may need to rotate the pie mid-bake, if one side is browning more rapidly than the other. 
Let cool for at least 2 hours before eating. 


Pumpkin Doughnuts

Pumpkin Donuts

Makes 15

Pumpkin purée and classic pumpkin pie spices give these doughnuts a soft, comforting texture and taste.

¼ ounce (1 envelope; 7g) dry yeast
¼ cup (60ml) warm water
¼ cup (50g) plus 1 teaspoon sugar, divided
2 tablespoons light brown sugar, packed
⅓ cup (80ml) soy milk
2 tablespoons (28g) margarine, at room temperature for at least 15 minutes
1 large egg
½ cup (120g) pumpkin purée (not pumpkin pie filling)
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon cinnamon
¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract
3–3¼ cups (375–405g) all-purpose flour, plus extra for dusting
canola oil for frying
¼ cup (30g) confectioners’ sugar for dusting

IN A LARGE BOWL, place the yeast, warm water, and one teaspoon of sugar and stir. Let the mixture sit for 10 minutes, or until thick.

ADD THE REMAINING SUGAR, brown sugar, soy milk, margarine, egg, pumpkin purée, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla, and 2 cups (250g) of the flour to the bowl and mix on low speed with either a dough hook in a stand mixer or a wooden spoon. Add another cup (125g) of flour and mix well. Add more flour, a tablespoon at a time, and mix it in until the dough becomes smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl each time before adding more flour.

COVER THE DOUGH with a clean dishtowel and let it rise for one hour in a warm place. I use a warming drawer on a low setting, or you can turn your oven on to its lowest setting, wait until it reaches that temperature, place the bowl in the oven, and then turn off the oven.

PUNCH DOWN THE DOUGH by folding it over a few times and reshaping it into a ball. Then re-cover the dough and let it rise for 10 minutes.

DUST A COOKIE SHEET with some flour. Sprinkle some flour on your counter or on a piece of parchment paper and roll the dough out until it’s about ½ inch (1.25cm) thick. Use a 2½-inch (6cm) round cookie cutter or drinking glass to cut out circles and place them on the prepared cookie sheet. Reroll any scraps. Cover the doughnuts with the towel. Place the cookie sheet back in the oven (warm but turned off) or warming drawer. Let the doughnuts rise for 45 minutes.

HEAT 1½ inches (4cm) of oil in a medium saucepan for a few minutes and use a candy thermometer to see when the temperature stays between 365°F and 375°F (185°C and 190°C); adjust the flame so the oil stays in that temperature range.

COVER A COOKIE SHEET with foil. Place a wire rack on top of it and set it near your stovetop. Gently slide no more than four doughnuts, top side down, into the oil and fry for 1½ minutes. Turn the doughnuts over and cook another 1½ minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon, letting excess oil drip off, and place on a wire rack to cool. Repeat for the remaining doughnuts. Dust with the confectioners’ sugar and serve. Store covered at room temperature for up to one day and reheat to serve.

Reprinted with permission from Holiday Kosher Baker © 2013 by Paula Shoyer, Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. Photography by Michael Bennett Kress

Almond and Olive Oil Cake

Almond Olive Cake
Serves 8-12

3/4 cup sliced almonds (with or without skins)
1 cup sugar
3 large eggs
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
1 cup all-purpose flour
½ cup ground almonds
1-½ teaspoons baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon almond extract
½ teaspoon orange zest (from one orange)
spray oil containing flour

Preheat oven to 350°F. Trace an 8-inch round pan on parchment paper and cut out. Grease and flour the pan, press in the parchment circle and grease and flour the top of the parchment and sides of the pan. Sprinkle the sliced almonds on the bottom of the pan and spread to cover.

In a medium bowl, beat the sugar, eggs and olive oil together until creamy, about one minute at medium speed. Add the flour, ground almonds, baking powder, salt, almond extract and orange zest and beat until combined. Pour over the sliced nuts. Bake for 35 minutes, or until a skewer inserted comes out clean.

Let cool in the pan for 10 minutes and then run a knife around the sides.
Turn the cake onto a wire rack and let cool. Serve almond side up. Store covered at room temperature for up to four days or freeze for up to three months.

Reprinted with permission from Holiday Kosher Baker © 2013 by Paula Shoyer, Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. Photography by Michael Bennett Kress

Doughnut Time

donuttime
It’s doughnut time! And that can mean many things to all different people. For me, I make the whole variety all week, from Oreo Stuffed Doughnuts, Doughnut Ice cream sandwiches (these are semi-homemade so go for it, they are so easy), Zepolles, Cinnamon Sugar Doughnut Holes, to my favorites, Baked Doughnuts. Whatever you are making, you need a few essential pieces of equipment.

Baked doughnuts are awesome and taste cake-like. If you serve them warm, no one will even miss the frying. But in order to get that perfect doughnut shape, you need the pan. I have the mini version and use it all year round. For bigger doughnuts, get the regular size.

The DeLonghi fryer is a great item if you have room in your kitchen. I use it for French fries, doughnuts, fried chicken and schnitzel. It has great safety features built in to prevent accidental burning and it creates lighter fried foods. It’s a good splurge piece if you like the real deal doughnut too.

Lastly, a powdered sugar duster is a must have item! I use it for everything from cakes to French toast, but it is the perfect way to dust those doughnuts with powdered sugar. It creates precise and light powdered sugar dust over anything.

Latke Essentials

latkeessentials

It’s latke time and that means getting a few essential pieces of equipment to make sure your latkes come out perfect every time. I tend to buy the inexpensive pieces without much thought and wait for a special sale or a holiday to splurge on items like hi-quality pots and pans. Remember though, these items are well worth the price because they last years, really a lot of years, and they really improve your cooking because they do not burn on the bottom, they conduct heat very well, and cook food more evenly by staying hot. I personally own all of these essential latke cooking equipment and with the addition of these great latke recipes, I make awesome latkes every Hanukah.

1. Nonpro Grip EZ Splatter Strainer
I love a splatter guard because it keeps my kitchen from getting too greasy while I fry up latkes or any other fried food, like doughnuts. I use it when I brown chicken too so it gets plenty of year round use.

2. OXO Silicone Flexible Pancake Turner
This is technically a pancake turner. I use it to flip latkes though because its wide enough for big latkes and the holes drain some of the oil that may otherwise flip with your latke. I like latkes crispy not greasy and this does the trick.

3. Taylor Candy Stainless Steel Thermometer
I use this thermometer to make sure the oil stays hot but not too hot while frying (about 350 degrees is perfect). It’s great because it’s a candy thermometer too so all the Purim peanut brittle and caramel sauces come out perfect with this too.

4. Le Creuset Enameled Cast Iron Skillet
Splurge on this!!! Great for latkes, omelettes, sautéing, pasta dishes or browning chicken. It’s worth every penny.

5. OXO Grips 3-piece Angled Measuring Cups
I use these everyday. For everything so I recommend them for measuring everything for every recipe. No more bending over to check the amount of liquid ingredients in the cup, you can check from above, extra markings for precision measurements, and it comes in a set of three. It’s a kitchen essential.

6. Cuisineart DFP 14BCN Processor (Brushed Stainless Steel)
Love my Cuisinart! I have a few and think you need one too.

7. If it’s too much, go with a good grater, like the Edgeware set. It has multiple settings for all sorts of uses. Plus the colors are terrific and make kashrut easier.

Thanksgivvukah, What wines are you serving?

The convergence of Thanksgiving and Hanukah is definitely a time for celebration of family, friends, and food.  But what to drink can be a bit confusing since traditional wine pairing may not work with both turkey and fried foods. Our friends at Royal Wine, are always on hand to help us make these decisions and make sure our wine is as good as our food.


Most wine experts would say that big and bold red wines such as Cabernet or Shiraz can overpower the delicate flavors of turkey.  But, Gary Landsman, our Royal Wine contributor says, “I think with a rich gravy these big wines pair fine with the food, especially if that is what people like.” I’m excited about this because I always like to have some cabernet with my meal.  Having said that, Zinfandel (such as Baron Herzog OLD VINE Zin) is a big red wine, but it’s frequently available and promoted on Thanksgiving since it is an American wine, synonymous with California.


Two other “traditional”  Thanksgiving wines are Pinot Noir (a light bodied red that won’t overpower turkey that also goes nicely with cranberry sauce because it often has hints of fruit in the wine) and Chardonnay.  Chardonnay is a rich white wine that pairs well with white meat turkey. Gary recommends, Goose Bay Pinot Noir (this is a big favorite in my house) and Herzog Russian River Chardonnay (the grapes grow near the Russian River Valley – thus the name, and add some unique flavors like lime and tropical tastes).  It’s definitely on my need to taste list.


Having said all that, the best pairing for latkes and fried foods or doughnuts is probably a nice bubbly.  This exciting and historical day when Hanukah and Thanksgiving actually match up calls for a toast too.  The Bartenura Prosecco, Elvi Adar Brut Cava or Drappier Champagne would be great ways to celebrate the double simcha.

Spinach Salad with Persimmons

spinachsalad-su

Serves 8

1/4 cup rice vinegar
2 tablespoons orange marmalade
1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
Salt and pepper
5 quarts baby spinach leaves (1 1/4 lb.), rinsed and crisped
3 firm Fuyu persimmons (5 oz. each), peeled and sliced into thin wedges
3/4 cup glazed pecans

In a large bowl, mix vinegar, marmalade, and sesame oil. Add salt and pepper to taste.
In a large bowl, toss the spinach, persimmons, and pecans. Mix gently to coat with dressing.

Pumpkin Bread Stuffed with Cream Cheese

pumpkinbread
Makes 3 loaves

FILLING
2 packages (8 ounces. each) cream cheese, softened
1/4 cup sugar
1 egg
1 tablespoon milk or soymilk
1 teaspoon maple extract or 1 tablespoon maple syrup

BREAD
3 cups sugar
1-3/4 cup pumpkin puree (or one 15oz can solid-packed pumpkin)
1 cup canola oil
1 cup water
4 eggs
4 cups all purpose flour
4 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 cup chopped pecans
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1 cup currants or raisins

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
In a mixer, beat the cream cheese, sugar, egg and milk until creamy, add your maple extract or syrup and blend. Set aside.
In a large bowl of a mixer, beat the sugar, pumpkin, oil, water and eggs. In another large bowl stir the flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and spices.

Gradually add the dry ingredients(the flour mixture) to the pumpkin mixture. Stir in the nuts. Pour half of the batter into three greased 8″ x 4″ loaf pans.

Spoon the filling (divided into three equal parts) over the batter in each pan. Use a spatula to spread it out carefully. Add the remaining batter over each loaf making sure you completely cover the filling.

Bake for 50 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool 10 minutes in the pans before removing the bread to a wire rack to cool completely. Store your bread in the refrigerator wrapped in plastic wrap until ready to serve.

Easiest Pumpkin Pie

Serves 8

9” baked pie shell
1-½ cups canned pure pumpkin
2 eggs
1 cup non-dairy creamer or soymilk
½ cup pure maple syrup
1 tablespoon flour
1 teaspoon cinnamon
½ teaspoon ground ginger
¼ teaspoon kosher salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Whisk pumpkin and eggs to blend in a medium bowl. Add soymilk, maple syrup, flour, cinnamon, ginger and salt and mix well until blended. Pour into a baked pie shell. Bake until center is just set, about 55 – 60 minutes. Transfer to a wire rach and cool. Serve with whipped cream sweetened with cinnamon.

Pumpkin Bread

Serves 8

¼ cup canola oil, plus more for pan
2 cups flour, plus more for pan
1½ cups sugar
¼ cup soy milk or non-dairy creamer
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1½ teaspoons ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon kosher salt
2 (15-ounces) cans pumpkin purée

Heat oven to 350° F. Grease and flour a 9″ round cake pan; set aside. Stir together oil, sugar, soymilk, vanilla, cinnamon, salt, and pumpkin in a bowl; add flour, and stir until just combined. Pour into prepared pan, and smooth top. Bake until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, about 1 hour. Cut into squares or wedges to serve.

Roast Turkey with Chestnut-Apple Stuffing

turkey

Serves 10-12

This is from Food and Wine magazine with a little GKC adaptation. Its great, sweet and savory.

TURKEY
One 13- to 15-pound turkey, neck and giblets reserved for stuffing (optional)
Kosher salt
2 sticks unsalted margarine, softened
2 tablespoons finely chopped sage
1 small shallot, minced
Freshly ground pepper
3 celery ribs, sliced 1/4 inch thick
2 medium carrots, sliced 1/4 inch thick
1 small onion, thinly sliced
2 cups chicken stock or low-sodium broth, for roasting

STUFFING
1 pound country bread or challah, crusts removed, bread cut into 1-inch cubes (12 cups)
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3 celery ribs, finely chopped
1 medium onion, finely chopped
3 Fuji apples—peeled, cored, quartered and thinly sliced crosswise
Reserved turkey giblets, finely chopped (optional)
1/4 cup finely chopped parsley
2 tablespoons finely chopped sage
1 tablespoon chopped thyme
2 teaspoons finely chopped rosemary
2 cups peeled roasted chestnuts, crumbled (14 ounces)
2 cups chicken stock or low-sodium broth, warmed
Salt
Freshly ground pepper

PREPARE THE TURKEY Rinse the turkey inside and out under cold water and pat it thoroughly dry with paper towels.. In a bowl, blend the margarine, sage and shallot and season with salt and pepper. Starting at the cavity end of the bird, slip your hand between the skin and meat, loosening the skin over the breast and around the legs. Spread the shallot-sage butter under the skin, covering as much of the breasts and legs as possible. Scatter the celery, carrots, onion and turkey neck in a large roasting pan and set the turkey on top; let stand at room temperature for 1 hour.

MEANWHILE, MAKE THE STUFFING Preheat the oven to 375°. Spread the bread cubes on a large rimmed baking sheet and bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until golden. Let cool slightly, then transfer to a large bowl.

Increase the oven temperature to 425° F. In a large skillet, heat the olive oil until shimmering. Add the celery and onion and cook over moderately high heat, stirring occasionally, until softened and barely browned, 7 minutes. Add the apples and giblets and cook, stirring occasionally, until the apples are just tender and the giblets are cooked, 5 minutes. Stir in the parsley, sage, thyme and rosemary and cook until fragrant, 1 minute. Add to the bread along with the chestnuts and the 2 cups of warm stock. Toss well and season the stuffing with salt and pepper; let cool.

Pack the turkey cavity and neck with the stuffing, then tie the legs together with kitchen twine. Roast for about 45 minutes, until richly browned. Baste with any accumulated pan juices and tent the breast with foil. Pour the remaining 2 cups of stock into the roasting pan. Turn the oven temperature down to 325° and roast the turkey for 2 to 2 1/2 hours longer, basting every 30 minutes; remove the foil for the last 30 minutes of roasting. The turkey is done when an instant-read thermometer inserted in an inner thigh registers 165°. Transfer the turkey to a carving board and let rest for at least 30 minutes.

Scoop the stuffing into a bowl. Strain the pan juices into a heatproof bowl and skim off the fat. Carve the turkey and serve with the stuffing and the strained pan juices.

Whipped Sweet Potatoes with Coconut and Ginger

whipped sweet potatoes

Serves 10

6 pounds sweet potatoes (6 large)
1 stick margarine, melted
3/4 cup unsweetened coconut milk
1-1/2 tablespoons finely grated peeled fresh ginger
Kosher salt
Freshly ground white pepper
Unsweetened finely shredded coconut, for garnish

Preheat the oven to 400°. Poke the sweet potatoes several times with a fork and bake on a baking sheet for about 1 hour, until tender. Let cool slightly.

Peel the sweet potatoes and transfer to a food processor. Add the butter, coconut milk and ginger and puree until smooth. Season the pureed potatoes with salt and white pepper, garnish with shredded coconut and serve right away.

More Thanksgivvukah Recipes, See them All!

thanksgivukkah

Appetizers
Spinach Salad with Persimmons
Sweet Potato Latke
Curried Leftover Turkey Salad
Quick Thai Pumpkin Soup

Main Dish

Herb Roasted Turkey Breast
Roast Turkey with Chestnut-Apple Stuffing
Classic Roast Turkey
Apple Brined Turkey
Roasted Turkey with Smoked Paprika
Perfect Roast Turkey
Chicken Breasts Stuffed with Pareve Ricotta Cheese and Olives with Balsamic Glaze
Fall Stew
Herb Roasted Turkey Breast
Perfect Roast Turkey

Side Dish

Mashed Potatoes with Sauteed Leeks
Mashed Potatoes with Wasabi
Whipped Sweet Potatoes with Coconut and Ginger
Spinach Salad with Apple Cider Vinaigrette
Green Bean Almondine
Creamy Mashed Potatoes
Roasted Cranberry Pear Relish
Pumpkin Pilaf
Sweet Potato Coconut Crumble
Special Spice Cranberry Relish
Butternut Squash Stuffin Muffins
Baby Winter Squash with Spiced Orange-Currant Stuffing
Roast Turkey with Chestnut-Apple Stuffing
Roasted Turkey Roulade with Sausage Stuffing
Roasted Turkey with Smoked Paprika
Sausage and Apple Kosher Stuffing
Stuffed Chicken with Turkey and Apple-Cranberry Sausage Stuffing
Stuffing
Turkey Pie with Cranberry Thyme Crust
Whipped Sweet Potatoes with Coconut and Ginger
Citrus Cranberry Sauce
Orange Maple Cranberry Sauce
Cranberry Chutney
Creamy Mashed Potatoes
Mashed Potatoes with Sauteed Leeks
Mashed Potatoes with Wasabi
Marilyn’s Stuffing
Provencal Potato Gratin
Pumpkin Pilaf
Smashed Potatoes with Pareve Sour Cream and Chives
Spanish Rice
Special Spice Cranberry Relish
Wild Rice with Roasted Grapes, Pecans and Sage
Lots of Stuffing Recipes here, Lots of Cranberry Sauces here, Potatoes everyway you can think of here

Desserts
Recipe by Paula Shoyer, author of The Holiday Kosher Baker
Pumpkin Doughnuts and Almond and Olive Oil Cake
Bourbon Pecan Pie
Pumpkin Bread Stuffed with Cream Cheese
Easiest Pumpkin Pie
Pumpkin Bread
Cranberry Apple Sauce
Doughnut Bread Pudding
Olive Oil Cake
Lemon Bars with Cranberries
Pecan Pie Bars
Chocolate Pumpkin Cupcakes
Pumpkin Mousse Pie with Pecan Streusel
Apple Blueberry Pie
Apple Pie with Cranberries
Best Whipped Sweet Potatoes with Caramelized Apples
Bourbon Pecan Pie
Pecan Pie Bars
Lemon Bars with Cranberries
Olive Oil Cake
Roasted Cranberry Pear Relish
Sweet Potato Coconut Crumble
Chocolate Pumpkin Cupcakes
Cranberry Macadamia Nut Stuffing
Cranberry-Pistachio Paté
Pumpkin Bread
Pumpkin Bread Stuffed with Cream Cheese
Pumpkin Doughnuts
Pumpkin Mousse Pie with Pecan Streusel
Spicy Pumpkin Cake with Maple Glaze

Mashed Potatoes with Wasabi

wasabi-mashed-potatoes

Serves 8

2-1/4 pounds large russet potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce
2 tablespoons powdered wasabi or wasabi paste
1 teaspoon sea salt
About 1 cup pareve whipping cream, warmed
Chopped chives

Bring a large pot with water to boil over high heat. Add potatoes and cook until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain and return to same pot.

Add remaining ingredients except chives Use a masher or a hand mixer to whip potatoes to a smooth consistency, adding more cream if needed. Transfer to a serving bowl and sprinkle with chopped chives

Chocolate Pumpkin Cupcakes

Makes 12 cupcakes

CUPCAKES
1-1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup soymilk
1 tablespoon vinegar
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 large eggs, at room temperature
3/4 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 cups flour
3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder

FROSTING
8 ounces tofutti cream cheese
1/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
2 tablespoons canned pumpkin
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
Pinch of salt
1-1/4 cups powdered sugar

TOPPING
About 1-1/2 cups pareve whipped cream
22 chocolate wafers or decorative pieces

Make cupcakes: Preheat oven to 350°. In a medium bowl, with a mixer on medium speed, beat sugar, soymilk, vinegar, oil, eggs, pumpkin, salt, and vanilla until well blended.

Whisk together flour, cocoa, baking soda, and baking powder in a medium bowl. Gradually add to wet mixture, beating on medium speed until smooth.

Line muffin pans with muffin cups and fill each cup with 3 tablespoons batter. Bake until a toothpick inserted in centers comes out clean, 25 minutes. Cool completely.

Make frosting: In a medium bowl, beat cream cheese, pumpkin pie spice, pumpkin, vanilla, and salt with a mixer until smooth. Beat in powdered sugar. Chill until firm, 1 hour. Spread on cupcakes and top each with whipped cream and a chocolate wafer or big shard of decorative chocolate. Chill until frosting is firm, about 30 minutes.

Special Spice Cranberry Relish

spiced-cranberry-relish

Serves 8-10
3 tablespoons canola oil
1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
½ tablespoon curry powder
12 ounces fresh cranberries
1-1/2 cups cilantro leaves
2 or 3 jalapenos chiles, stemmed and chopped
1 teaspoon sugar
1-1/2 teaspoons kosher salt

In a saucepan, heat oil. Add Dijon mustard, turmeric, garlic powder, and curry. Add cranberries and cook until softened, about 3 – 5 minutes.
Blend remaining ingredients in a food processor until smooth, adding up to 1/4 cup of water if it looks too thick.
Transfer to a serving bowl and stir in spiced cranberry mixture.

*Find in Indian grocery stores. You can use 4 or 5 dried curry leaves instead of fresh (don’t use powder). If you can’t find asafetida and curry leaves, relish won’t have the same Indian flavor, but will still taste fresh and delicious.

Make ahead: Up to 2 days. Cover and chill.

Apple Brined Turkey

applebrine turkey

Serves 12

BRINE
3 cups apple juice
1 green apple, quartered
1/2 navel orange
2 tablespoons coriander seeds
2 tablespoons fennel seeds
4 tarragon sprigs
1 medium bunch of thyme
2 garlic cloves, crushed
2 tablespoons Old Bay seasoning
8 sage leaves
2 whole cloves
1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns
2 cups light brown sugar
1 cup kosher salt
One 15-pound turkey

HERB RUB
2 sticks unsalted butter (1-1/2 pounds), at room temperature
3 tablespoons chopped thyme
3 tablespoons chopped parsley
2 tablespoons chopped chives
2 tablespoons chopped sage
Salt
Freshly ground pepper

BRINE THE TURKEY
In a pot, combine all of the ingredients except the turkey and add 4 cups of water. Bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Remove from the heat and add 12 cups of cold water. Let stand until cool. Add the turkey and refrigerate for 12 hours.
Set a rack over a rimmed baking sheet. Remove the turkey from the brine and transfer it to the prepared rack; pat the turkey dry with paper towels and refrigerate it uncovered for 12 hours.

MAKE THE HERB RUB
In a medium bowl, blend all of the ingredients except the salt and pepper.
Set a clean rack over a clean baking sheet and set a large rack in a large roasting pan. Gently separate the turkey skin from the breast meat. Rub half of the herb butter over the breast meat under the skin. Spread the remaining herb rub all over the skin of the breast and legs; season with salt and pepper. Set the breast in the prepared roasting pan. Let stand at room temperature for 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 400° F. Roast the turkey for about 2 hours, basting every 15 minutes with the melted herb rub and tenting the breast with foil after 30 minutes, until an instant-read thermometer registers 165° in the thickest part of the breast and 180° in the inner thigh. Let rest for 30 minutes. Carve and serve.