DIY Doughnut Ice Cream Sundaes with Homemade Fudge Sauce and Sesame Caramel Sauce

doughnuticecream

For Chanukah I usually serve doughnuts with some homemade twist, like doughnut bread pudding or doughnut ice cream sandwiches. This year, I’m making DIY doughnut ice cream sundaes, how decadent is that?!
Here is how I’m doing it but certainly use your own flair and let me know how they come out.
What you need:
Doughnuts (I like cake-style for this)
Assorted toppings: ice cream, sprinkles, nuts, chocolate chips, bananas, whipping cream, cookie crumbs, etc.
Sauces: these two below are amazing, or buy anything you like.

Chocolate Fudge Sauce
Salted Sesame Caramel

Make a buffet for assembly and have fun!

Salted Sesame Caramel

salted-caramel-sauce
Makes 2 cups

This has real sesame flavor from the tahini. Cream of tartar is optional, but it keeps the sugar from crystallizing, making this caramel foolproof.

1 cup sugar
Pinch of cream of tartar (optional)
¼ cup tahini
2 tablespoons unsalted margarine or butter
⅔ cup pareve whipping cream or heavy cream
¼ cup sesame seeds, toasted
¾ teaspoon kosher salt

Bring sugar, cream of tartar, if using, and 3 Tbsp. water to a boil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring to dissolve sugar. Boil until sugar begins to caramelize in spots. Stir with a heatproof spatula (this will help sugar cook evenly) and cook, stirring occasionally, until the color of honey, 5–7 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally, until caramel is a deep amber color, about 5 minutes longer.

Remove caramel from heat and carefully whisk in tahini and margarine/butter, then cream, sesame seeds, and salt. Let cool slightly before serving.

Do Ahead: Caramel sauce can be made 1 week ahead. Let cool; cover and chill.

Chocolate Fudge Sauce

Chocolate-Fudge-Sauce

(Adult and Child Version)
Makes 2 cups

It’s just as tasty without booze but only as good as the chocolate you use, so shop accordingly.

⅓ cup sugar
¼ cup light corn syrup
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
6 ounces bittersweet chocolate (about 70% cacao), chopped
¼ cup bourbon, whiskey, or rum, optional
½ teaspoon kosher salt

Bring sugar, corn syrup, cocoa powder, and 1 cup water to a boil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring to dissolve sugar. Reduce heat and simmer until it begins to thicken, 10–12 minutes. Add chocolate, bourbon, and salt and return to a simmer, whisking. Cook, whisking, until sauce is thick and glossy, about 5 minutes. Let cool slightly before serving.

Do Ahead: Sauce can be made 1 week ahead. Let cool; cover and chill.

Passion Fruit Bubbly

passion-fruit-bubbly

This one is easy and sweet and the bubbles make it fancy, definite crowd pleaser!

What you’ll need:
Large Pitcher
1 Bottle Morad Passion Fruit Wine (Chilled)
1 Bottle Bartenura Prosecco (Chilled)

Combine both bottles, mix gently and serve right away to maintain all the bubbles. Just that simple!

Dreidel Rum Punch

dreidel_rum_punch

Be careful with this one, drink too much and your head will be spinning!
Rum is a wonderfully versatile spirit that can be mixed with just about everything and the Walder’s Creamy Liqueur add a decadent rich layer to this festive punch

What you’ll need:
Large punch bowl
1 Bottle Ron Viejo De Caldas 3 Year Aged Rum
4 Cans Ginger Ale
4 Cups Pineapple Juice
1 Bottle Walder’s Vodka & Vanilla Creamy Liqueur
Plenty of Ice

In a large punch bowl, combine all of the ingredients except the ice and ginger ale. Refrigerate the punch for about an hour before you’re ready to serve. Then, add the ice, ginger ale and stir.

New Chocolate Chips On the Market

chocolatechip
I have good news, what I consider really good news! My friend Estee Kafra, of kosherscoop.com has packaged and created a new PAREVE CHOCOLATE CHIP, that is delicious, divine, and full of fabulous flavor. Finally, finally, we can all stop mourning the loss of Trader Joe’s chocolate chips.

These chocolate chips, called Best Ingredients For Best Results, semi-sweet chocolate chips, pareve, gluten-free, vegan, and no nuts are coming soon to your local markets (or go ask for them!) and now available on Amazon.com.

The taste is rich and chocolaty and they are made with 45% cocoa and 100% Barry Callebaut chocolate. No garbage ingredients, real tasty chocolate for baking, cooking, melting and just eating. I did all of the above! I made Aunt Cassi’s low fat Oatmeal cookies, Chili Chocolate Dipped Strawberries, added them to homemade granola, and made a fantastic Chocolate Chicken Mole (it calls for unsweetened chocolate but this made it really good).

These chips are a great new product and I am so excited for you to try them and to change your baking forever. There is no comparison to the imitation chips and other packaged chocolate chips currently on the market that are available. These are affordable and delicious. Way to go Estee Kafra, thank you for filling the needs of the kosher food community.

Churros

Churros

Recipe by Paula Shoyer, The Kosher Baker

Makes 35
Churros are long, thin-ridged Spanish doughnuts made out of choux pastry, the dough used for éclairs and profiteroles. In Cuba and Brazil, churros are filled, just as we fill sufganiyot. Here they are rolled in cinnamon sugar, the way they are eaten as street food in many Latin American countries.

Dough
1 cup (240ml) water
¼ cup (60ml) canola oil, plus extra for frying
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup (125g) all-purpose flour
3 large eggs

Cinnamon Sugar
⅓ cup (65g) sugar
2 teaspoons cinnamon
8 ounces (230g) melted chocolate for dipping, if desired

Preparing the dough

PLACE THE WATER, oil, sugar, vanilla, and salt into a small saucepan and stir over medium heat to dissolve the sugar. Bring to a rolling boil. Reduce heat to low and add the flour.

USE A WOODEN SPOON to mix the dough over the heat until the flour is completely mixed in and the dough comes together into a ball, about 30 seconds. Remove this mixture from the heat and scoop it into a medium bowl. Spread the dough around the bowl and press the dough up the sides of the bowl and let sit for about two minutes to help it cool down.

ADD THE EGGS one at a time, mixing well after each addition. You will need to mix vigorously to incorporate the eggs. Press the dough into the sides of the bowl with the spoon to mash the eggs into the dough. The dough will clump up, but after more stirring it will come together. Put the dough in a pastry bag fitted with a large star tip or a round tip with points, with about a ⅓-inch (8-mm) opening; I use Ateco #864.

IN A SHALLOW BOWL, combine the sugar and cinnamon. Set aside.

HEAT 1½ inches (4cm) of oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat until the temperature holds at 375°F (190°C). Place a wire rack over an aluminum foil-covered baking sheet. Hold the pastry bag an inch or two over the hot oil by reaching a little into the saucepan. With the pastry bag in one hand and a knife or kitchen scissors in the other, quickly squeeze out a 3- to 4-inch-long (8- to 10-cm) strip of dough and then use the knife or scissors to cut it off and let the dough drop into the hot oil. Repeat five more times. Cook no more than six strips of dough at a time.

AFTER ONE MINUTE, separate any churros that are stuck together. Fry for a total of four to five
minutes, turning them over after about two minutes, until they’re golden. Use a slotted spoon to lift the churros onto the rack to cool slightly for a minute, or until you can handle them. Roll the churros in the cinnamon sugar and serve. Do not wait until the churros are completely cool before rolling them in the sugar; the residual oil helps the cinnamon sugar stick to the churros. These are best eaten the day they are made. Serve with melted chocolate. Store covered at room temperature for up to two days or freeze for up to three months. Reheat to serve

Chanukah Inspiration and Recipes by Paula Shoyer

HKBCover

Chanukah Inspiration and Recipes by Paula Shoyer, author of The Holiday Kosher Baker and The Kosher Baker

When I was writing The Holiday Kosher Baker (Sterling 2013) I included a spiritual message in every chapter introduction. The Chanukah one is my favorite, because the message is so universal. Chanukah teaches us that you do not have to have all your resources before you start a project. Many of us have great ideas, but do not pursue them because we are waiting to gather more information, be more prepared or just waiting for the right time. When the Jews found the small pot of oil in the Temple, they could have easily decided not to bother lighting the menorah at all. Instead, they decided to just go for it, and they lit the menorah just expecting it to be lit for only one day. The miracle happened and it should inspire us to take chances, even when we cannot imagine what we might accomplish. I try to remember this lesson when I start a new recipe: just try it out and see where it goes.

Here are two of my favorite Chanukah recipes, churros dipped in chocolate as a a change from doughnuts, and an almond and olive oil cake, if you want to celebrate the miracle of the oil without frying, Happy Chanukah!

Paula Shoyer
The Kosher Baker
www.thekosherbaker.com

Chanukah Cocktails for Your Chanukah Party

Chanukah Cocktails! Don’t Miss These Great Drinks at your Chanukah Party

When it comes to wine, everyone has an opinion, so what do you do when you’re hosting a Chanukah party and everyone wants something different? We asked our resident party expert (and director of wine education for Royal Wine Corp.) Jay Buchsbaum and he suggested mixing up a batched cocktail. Why? It’s easy, you can make it in large quantities ahead of time, and people can help themselves as opposed to you pouring every glass. Jay lists some favorites below, but the possibilities are endless. So grab a large punch bowl or pitcher (or several, if you’re creating more than one recipe) and don’t just host your party, enjoy it too!
Passion Fruit Bubbly
Dreidel Rum Punch
Winter Sangria

Just remember, the important thing about hosting a party is spending time with friends and family, not your kitchen. Enjoy and happy Chanukah!

Almond and Olive Oil Cake

Almond Olive Cake

Recipe by Paula Shoyer, The Kosher Baker
Serves 8 to 12

The use of olive oil in cakes dates back farther than the Chanukah story itself. Olive oil was used in baked offerings at the Temple. This is a super easy teatime cake that reminds me of simple cakes I have eaten in Italy. If you are feeling decadent, serve this with whipped cream.

¾ cup (90g) sliced almonds (with or without skins)
1 cup (200g) sugar
3 large eggs
½ cup (120ml) extra virgin olive oil
1 cup (125g) all-purpose flour
½ cup (60g) ground almonds
1½ teaspoons baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon almond extract
½ teaspoon orange zest (from one orange)
spray oil containing flour

PREHEAT OVEN to 350°F (180°C). Trace an 8-inch (20-cm) round pan on parchment paper and cut it out with scissors. Grease and flour the pan, press in the parchment circle; and grease and flour the top of the parchment and sides of the pan. Sprinkle and spread the sliced almonds on the bottom of the pan to cover it.

IN A MEDIUM BOWL, beat the sugar, eggs, and olive oil for about one minute at medium speed until creamy. Add the flour, ground almonds, baking powder, salt, almond extract, and orange zest and beat until combined. Pour the mixture over the sliced nuts. Bake for 35 minutes, or until a skewer inserted in the middle of the cake comes out clean.

LET THE CAKE COOL in the pan for 10 minutes and then run a knife around the sides. Turn the cake onto a wire rack and let it cool. Serve the cake almond side up. Store it covered at room temperature for up to four days or freeze for up to three months.

Winter Sangria

winter_sangria
Don’t worry about following this recipe exactly, sangria is a very forgiving drink that can be made with nearly limitless variations. Don’t have apples, use pears, have some extra oranges laying around, slice them up and add them in…

What you’ll need:
Large pitcher
1 bottle Jeunesse Cabernet Sauvignon
½ bottle of Morad Pomegranate Wine
½ cup pomegranate seeds
½ cup sliced apples
1 cinnamon stick
¼ cup of sugar

In a large pitcher, combine fruit, sugar and cinnamon stick, and wine. Stir and refrigerate 3-4 hours (you can prepare the night before to save even more time!) so all the flavors come together. Want to kick it up a notch, add a little sparkling wine or champagne right before serving.

Heirloom Potato Latkes

latkes-blog

Makes 24
3 pounds russet potatoes, about 6
1 vidalia onion
2 eggs
1/4 cup breads crumbs or matzo meal
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons (or more) schmaltz (chicken fat; optional)
2-4 tablespoons (or more) vegetable oil
Applesauce
Sour cream

Preheat oven to 325°. Peel potatoes. Using the large holes of a box grater or the grater disk on a food processor, grate potatoes and onions. Transfer to a large kitchen towel. Gather ends of towel; twist over sink and squeeze firmly to wring out as much liquid as possible. Open towel; toss mixture to loosen. Gather towel; wring out once more.

Whisk eggs, breadcrumbs, salt, baking powder, and pepper in a medium bowl to blend. Add potato mixture. Using your fingers, mix until well coated. (Latke mixture should be wet and thick, not soupy.)

Line a large rimmed baking sheet with several layers of paper towels. Set a wire rack inside another large rimmed baking sheet; set aside. Heat 2 tablespoons schmaltz, if using, and 2 tablespoons oil (or 4 tablespoons oil if not using schmaltz; fat should measure about 1/8 inches) in a 12 inches nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Drop a small amount of latke mixture into pan. If the fat sizzles around the edges, it’s ready. (Do not let fat smoke.)

Working in batches and adding more schmaltz and oil to skillet as needed to maintain 1/8 inches fat, drop large spoonfuls of mixture into pan, pressing gently with the back of a spoon or spatula to flatten slightly. (If mixture becomes watery between batches, mix to incorporate; do not drain.)

Cook latkes, occasionally rotating pan for even browning, until golden brown and cooked through, 2 1/2-3 minutes per side. (If small pieces of potato floating in the oil start to burn, carefully strain out.)

Transfer latkes to paper towel-lined baking sheet to drain, then transfer to prepared wire rack. Place sheet with latkes in oven to keep warm and crisp while cooking remaining latkes.

Serve warm latkes with applesauce and sour cream.

Pulled Brisket-Topped Latkes

SONY DSC
My friend Malkie Hirsch, from Kiss the Kosher Cook, posted this recipe on facebook. She saw it posted on Thenosher.com. All I can say is thank you for sharing this wonderful concept and recipe. Rich and tasty pulled brisket mashed up with crispy fresh latkes. It’s a homerun idea and definitely being served at one or many of my Hanukah meals.

Serves 10

For the brisket:
2-3 pounds brisket
1 tablespoon salt
½ tablespoon freshly grated black pepper
2 teaspoon garlic powder
2 teaspoons onion powder
1 teaspoon dried parsley
3-4 tablespoons olive oil
1 can beer
1 can ginger ale
1 bottle red wine
4 ounces tomato paste
4 medium carrots, cut into medium size pieces
2 onions, cut into quarters

For the latkes:
12 medium-large Yukon gold potatoes, peeled and cut into large chunks
4 small onions, or 1 medium-large onion, cut into large chunks
4 garlic cloves, peeled and left whole
¾ -1 cup flour
4 eggs, lightly beaten
1 ½ tablespoons salt
½ tablespoon pepper, or to taste
Vegetable oil for frying

To make the brisket:

In a small bowl combine salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder and parsley. Spread dry rub on both sides of brisket evenly. Preheat the oven to 300F degrees.

Heat the olive oil in a large dutch oven or pot on medium high heat. Sear the brisket on both sides “until the smoke detector goes off.” Remove meat and set aside.

Using the remaining oil and “good bits” on the bottom of the pan, sauté carrots and onions, scraping the bottom until the veggies are soft, about 8-10 minutes. Add the tomato paste and stir until thoroughly mixed.

Put the brisket back in the pan, and cover with the bottle of red wine, beer and ginger ale. Place the entire pot with brisket into the oven, and cook for at least 3-4 hours, until meat is completely tender.

When the meat is fork tender, remove the meat and set aside on a large cutting board.

Let the sludge rise to the top of the pot liquid and skim it off. Strain out the carrots and onions and using a food processor, blend them with 1-2 cups of the cooking liquid, then return the blended mixture to the rest of the liquid and simmer to reduce slightly.

On the cutting board using two forks, carefully shred the brisket into small strands. Add 1-2 cups of the pureed cooking liquid to the pulled brisket for additional moisture and flavor.

Serve in a large bowl and allow guests to top latkes, or spoon small amounts of brisket on each latke for a more elegant presentation.

To make the latkes:

Using the shredding attachment of a food processor or a hand grater, coarsely great potatoes, onions and garlic. Place in a large bowl.

Add flour, eggs, salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly until completely combined. Allow to sit 5-10 minutes. Drain excess liquid.

Heat vegetable oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Using your hands, make a small latke patty and squeeze out excess liquid again. Fry for 3-4 minutes on each side, until golden brown. Remove from pan and place on wire cooling rack placed on a baking sheet, which you can place in a warm oven until ready to serve.

Maple Ginger Roasted Sweet Potatoes

maplegingersweetpotatoes2

Excerpted from Gluten Free Around the World by Aviva Kanoff

Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients:
4 large sweet potatoes, unpeeled and diced
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons peeled, chopped fresh ginger
3 tablespoons maple syrup
a pinch of ground cinnamon
a pinch of nutmeg

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 400°.
2. Mix all ingredients in a large bowl until sweet potatoes are fully coated, then place on a roasting pan and bake until sweet potatoes are soft, about 35-40 minutes, tossing occasionally. Serve immediately.

Beef Tacos

Beef tacos with lettuce cheese and tomato
Excerpted from Gluten Free Around the World by Aviva Kanoff

Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients:
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large white onion, diced
1 garlic clove, minced
2 pounds ground beef
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
½ teaspoon cracked black pepper
¼ teaspoon ground chipotle
¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro or parsley
12 (6-inch) corn tortillas, warmed
salsa, guacamole and lime juice

Directions:

1. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Once hot, add onion and garlic and sauté, stirring occasionally, until onion is translucent and garlic is golden brown, about 5 minutes, then add beef, salt, cumin, paprika, cracked pepper, and chipotle. Stir until beef is cooked through, about 7-10 minutes.

2. Once beef is cooked, add cilantro or parsley. Serve with warmed tortillas, your favorite salsa, guacamole, and a squeeze of lime.

“Gluten-Free Around the World”

Aviva Kanoff, author of No-Potato Passover, is back with a new book, Gluten-Free Around the World, which not only expands the culinary options for people who follow a gluten-free diet but gives the reader a fantastic taste of traveling the world. Her experiences have become her inspiration for creating great recipes in anyone’s own kitchen.

Gluten-free is not just a food fad, it’s a serious diet for people who suffer from celiac disease, anyone with wheat allergy or an intolerance to gluten or who suffers from any of a multitude of ailments ranging from digestive disorders, asthma or skin problems, may also benefit from a gluten-free diet. The challenge is how to prepare tasty, appealing gluten-free food. There are no simple substitutions, no easy fixes. If you’re kosher, the dietary prohibitions make it even more of a challenge. Aviva Kanoff, helps makes this easier with her new book, Gluten-Free Around the World.

It’s packed with recipes for tantalizing, creative foods she has tasted during her travels to such far places as Ecuador and India, Cambodia and Morocco and more. Recipes range from the enduring (Blueberry Scones) to the contemporary (Candied Fig and Goat Cheese Salad), from riffs on classics (Fish Tacos) to ethnic specialties (Beef Pho)..

Aviva is know as the “”the Indiana Jones of cooking” — an adventurer, world traveler and fearless hero on the ground, in any vehicle and anywhere with a cooktop. This is the kind of person I would like to befriend. Her globe-trotting has taken her to the far reaches of Peru and India, Italy to Israel, Croatia to Southeast Asia and then some, where she has tasted the local flavors, photographed the feasts and recreated the bountifully flavored dishes of these exotic places in her own kitchen. The photos and the recipes will make you feel like you have visited some of these places yourself. Try these sneak peak recipes:

Beef Tacos
Maple Ginger Roasted Sweet Potatoes

Check out her new book. It’s a great Chanukah gift too.
Available at Amazon.com for $29.99

 

Or GKC has one for one lucky winner, Submit to win!

Dirt Bombs

dirt-bombs
Dirt Bombs just like a Cinnamon-Sugar Doughnut
Makes 12
Like a cinnamon-sugar doughnut in muffin form. You’ve been warned. I found this recipe in Bon Appetit and its delightful.

Muffins
Nonstick vegetable oil spray
2¼ cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
½ cup (1 stick) margarine or butter, room temperature
¾ cup sugar
1 large egg
1 cup non-dairy creamer or whole milk

Topping and Assembly
½ cup sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
6 tablespoons (¾ stick) unsalted margarine or butter, melted

Muffins
Preheat oven to 375°. Coat a standard 12-cup muffin pan with nonstick spray. Whisk flour, baking powder, salt, and nutmeg in a medium bowl; set aside.
Using an electric mixer, beat margarine/butter and sugar in a large bowl until light and fluffy, about 4 minutes. Beat in egg. With mixer on low speed, add dry ingredients in 3 additions alternating with non-dairy creamer/milk in 2 additions, beginning and ending with dry ingredients.
Divide batter among muffin cups and bake, rotating pan halfway through, until a tester inserted into center comes out clean, 30–35 minutes. Let cool 5 minutes in pan, then transfer to a wire rack.

Topping and Assembly
Mix sugar and cinnamon in a medium bowl. Working one at a time, dip tops of muffins in melted butter, then cinnamon sugar.

Four Steps to Latke Love

latkes-blog
In my opinion, latkes are either great or not worth eating. One or the other. Crispy, slightly salty, no greasy aftertaste, and full of potato and onion flavor are what come to mind for a great latke. Over the years I’ve tried many recipes and techniques and honestly the recipes only vary in marginal ways, like using flour or matzo meal as a thickener, schmaltz or oil for the fat, baking powder or none, but generally potatoes, onions, eggs, salt and oil yield a great product if made well.

GKC top 4 tips to create awesome crispy, crunchy, delicious tasting latkes…

1. Squeeze out the liquid: Place the grated potato mixture in a kitchen towel and aggressively wring out as much liquid as possible. This concentrates flavor and prevents sogginess.

2. Switch up the fat: If you can find schmaltz (chicken fat), use it, it adds flavor. Blend it with vegetable oil (you need the oil’s high smoke point) for frying.

3. Test the temp: If your oil is too hot, you’ll burn the outside of the latke before it cooks through. If it’s too cool, the potatoes will soak up the oil. Medium-high heat is just right for achieving a beautiful crust. To tell, whether the oil is ready, drop, in a bit of the mixture. If it sizzles, start frying.

4. Keep them crisp: Unless you want to stand at the cooktop while everyone eats, you will need to keep a few batches hot while making the rest. Place the cooked latkes on a wire rack in a 325 degree oven which prevents them from sitting in their grease and lets heat circulate to keep that crunch.

What to do with used frying oil?

Reuse it. I don’t reuse my frying oil but if yours remains clear and light in color, you can extend its life by straining out the crumbs and storing it after its cooled.

Discard It. Don’t pour used frying oil down the drain. Instead, let it cool, pour it into a biodegradable container, such as a paper milk carton, and throw it out with your regular trash.

Try this Heirloom Latkes recipe.

Giveaway: Gluten-Free Around the World Cookbook

gv-glutenfree
Just in time for Chanukah…
Gluten-Free Around the World

Need a gift for someone who follows a gluten-free diet, or someone who enjoys travel and inspirational food? Gluten-Free Around the World is the perfect option. GKC has one to give away, but make sure you read all about it in the blog and catch the sneak-peak recipes too.

Submit to Win!

To enter to win the Gluten-Free Around the World Cookbook either:
1. Subscribe.
2. If you are already a subscriber, send us a comment. We love to hear your thoughts and ideas.
3. Follow us on Twitter or tweet about this post to your followers

Winter Wines to Keep Your Eye On

winterwines
Chase away the winter blues…Try some of Jay Buchsbaum’s winter wine suggestions

Ah, the winter.

As much as we keep our layers light and our heat off, there’s no denying the temperature is rapidly dropping. The good news? A change in season means switching up your wine selection.

“When it gets cold and it comes to food, we want comfort food: stuff that’s warm, inviting, easy to eat, richer in flavor,” says Wine Educator Jay Buchsbaum. “Wine is not much different.”

Since we’re always looking to pair what we drink with what we eat, it’s important to seek out wines that complement the comfort food as opposed to overpower it –or vice versa.

“I’m big on white wines,” Jay says. “I tell the community at large, we’re so hyper focused on red wines, and we should be confused more on whites. They’re so versatile and amenable to so many lighter foods, foods we eat during the week. But come the winter season, when dishes get heavier and richer, lighter more nuanced white wines often don’t stand up.”

The alternative? Wines that fill up your stomach and your palate. Jay’s choice? Late harvest reds, big and bold spicy cabernets. Because the sugars in these late harvests are higher, so is the alcohol content. “We look for wines that are as full in body as they are in spirit, if you will.”

And let’s not forget dessert. “The fun part about comfort foods is the sweet stuff you have at the end of the meal, and that goes for wines too! When pairing wines to desserts, you want to match the sweetness. With a heavy rich dark chocolate desserts try ports, sauternes which are sweeter, richer and thicker; but be careful they are very often higher in alcohol too.”

So what does a comforting meal with Jay entail?

Something hot and salty, like a pastrami sandwich. Pair it with Herzog Reserve Napa Cabernet. The flavor is typical Napa, big fruit flavor.

A beef stew or a lamb dish, spiced, but not too peppery. Try Flam Reserve Cabernet from Israel.

And for dessert: a hot chocolate melt down cake, which pairs perfectly with Porto Cordavero, a delicious Portuguese Port.

Yum. Who wouldn’t want to eat a meal with Jay?

 

Cabernet Braised Short Ribs with Fall Root Vegetables and Fried Onions

cabernetribs
Serves 6

1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon coriander
½ teaspoon ground ginger1/2 teaspoon cumin
½ teaspoon smoked paprika
½ teaspoon black pepper
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
¼ teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons canola oil
5 – 6 lbs. bone-in short ribs
1 onion, cut into chunks
2 carrots cut into 1-inch pieces
2 celery stalks, cut into 1-inch pieces
2 cloves garlic
1 teaspoon fresh thyme
1 (6 ounce) can tomato paste
1 ½ cups cabernet sauvignon wine
2 cups beef stock
6 cups assorted vegetables, like parsnips, sweet potatoes, carrots, turnips), cut into 1-inch dice
2 tablespoons olive oil
¾ cup fried onions, like French’s

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a small bowl, stir salt through cinnamon (all spices). Rub spice mixture evenly onto short ribs on all sides. Heat 1 tablespoon canola oil in a large heavy pot over medium heat, until very hot. Brown on each side, about 8 minutes per side, working in batches. Remove meat from pot. Add remaining canola oil and cook onion, carrot, celery and garlic, about 5 minutes. Add thyme and tomato paste, cook, stirring frequently, about 4 minutes. Return meat to pot, add wine, and beef stock. Add more stock if necessary, until beef is almost covered but not completely submerged. Bring to a simmer, cover and bake in oven until meat is tender about 3 hours.

In a separate roasting pan, toss vegetables with olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. During last 45 minutes of cooking, roast vegetables for 45 minutes. When meat is removed from oven, increase oven temperature to 400. Roast vegetables an additional 15-20 minutes.

If desired, puree meat sauce with an immersion blender. Serve meat with vegetables and sauce. Sprinkle with fried onions.

Hanukkah Recipes, Tips, Essentials, Wines and Articles

Hanukkah
Hanukkah o Hanukkah, is around the corner. Are your menorah’s polished? Are you ready for some frying? I feel like I just cleaned up from Succos and finished my pumpkin pie from Thanksgiving, but I guess that is what keeps us going, the celebrations that bring light and joy into our families and homes.

In order to get ready for Hanukkah, I’m often asked about recipes, articles and tips that were previously posted. I like to send at least one roundup piece so that you can find everything and anything you might need all in one place. So here goes…

Looking for:
Latke recipes? Latke recipe roundup right here
Latke Essentials, get all the tools and equipment for perfect latkes
Latke Freezing Tips
Hanukkah Cookies, Jewel cookies
It’s doughnut time, get the recipes here
Lighten Up, lighter doughnuts for all tastes, 3 different kinds
Doughnut making essentials, get all the tools and essentials here
Homemade Applesauce
Kosher chefs light up Chanukah with their favorite recipes
Eight Wines for Eight Nights of Chanukah AND more Chanukah Wines
Almond and Olive Oil Cake
The Dreidel Game, the official one
Chanukah Music by Sam Glaser