Beef Tacos

Beef tacos with lettuce cheese and tomato
Excerpted from Gluten Free Around the World by Aviva Kanoff

Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients:
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large white onion, diced
1 garlic clove, minced
2 pounds ground beef
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
½ teaspoon cracked black pepper
¼ teaspoon ground chipotle
¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro or parsley
12 (6-inch) corn tortillas, warmed
salsa, guacamole and lime juice

Directions:

1. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Once hot, add onion and garlic and sauté, stirring occasionally, until onion is translucent and garlic is golden brown, about 5 minutes, then add beef, salt, cumin, paprika, cracked pepper, and chipotle. Stir until beef is cooked through, about 7-10 minutes.

2. Once beef is cooked, add cilantro or parsley. Serve with warmed tortillas, your favorite salsa, guacamole, and a squeeze of lime.

“Gluten-Free Around the World”

Aviva Kanoff, author of No-Potato Passover, is back with a new book, Gluten-Free Around the World, which not only expands the culinary options for people who follow a gluten-free diet but gives the reader a fantastic taste of traveling the world. Her experiences have become her inspiration for creating great recipes in anyone’s own kitchen.

Gluten-free is not just a food fad, it’s a serious diet for people who suffer from celiac disease, anyone with wheat allergy or an intolerance to gluten or who suffers from any of a multitude of ailments ranging from digestive disorders, asthma or skin problems, may also benefit from a gluten-free diet. The challenge is how to prepare tasty, appealing gluten-free food. There are no simple substitutions, no easy fixes. If you’re kosher, the dietary prohibitions make it even more of a challenge. Aviva Kanoff, helps makes this easier with her new book, Gluten-Free Around the World.

It’s packed with recipes for tantalizing, creative foods she has tasted during her travels to such far places as Ecuador and India, Cambodia and Morocco and more. Recipes range from the enduring (Blueberry Scones) to the contemporary (Candied Fig and Goat Cheese Salad), from riffs on classics (Fish Tacos) to ethnic specialties (Beef Pho)..

Aviva is know as the “”the Indiana Jones of cooking” — an adventurer, world traveler and fearless hero on the ground, in any vehicle and anywhere with a cooktop. This is the kind of person I would like to befriend. Her globe-trotting has taken her to the far reaches of Peru and India, Italy to Israel, Croatia to Southeast Asia and then some, where she has tasted the local flavors, photographed the feasts and recreated the bountifully flavored dishes of these exotic places in her own kitchen. The photos and the recipes will make you feel like you have visited some of these places yourself. Try these sneak peak recipes:

Beef Tacos
Maple Ginger Roasted Sweet Potatoes

Check out her new book. It’s a great Chanukah gift too.
Available at Amazon.com for $29.99

 

Or GKC has one for one lucky winner, Submit to win!

Dirt Bombs

dirt-bombs
Dirt Bombs just like a Cinnamon-Sugar Doughnut
Makes 12
Like a cinnamon-sugar doughnut in muffin form. You’ve been warned. I found this recipe in Bon Appetit and its delightful.

Muffins
Nonstick vegetable oil spray
2¼ cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
½ cup (1 stick) margarine or butter, room temperature
¾ cup sugar
1 large egg
1 cup non-dairy creamer or whole milk

Topping and Assembly
½ cup sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
6 tablespoons (¾ stick) unsalted margarine or butter, melted

Muffins
Preheat oven to 375°. Coat a standard 12-cup muffin pan with nonstick spray. Whisk flour, baking powder, salt, and nutmeg in a medium bowl; set aside.
Using an electric mixer, beat margarine/butter and sugar in a large bowl until light and fluffy, about 4 minutes. Beat in egg. With mixer on low speed, add dry ingredients in 3 additions alternating with non-dairy creamer/milk in 2 additions, beginning and ending with dry ingredients.
Divide batter among muffin cups and bake, rotating pan halfway through, until a tester inserted into center comes out clean, 30–35 minutes. Let cool 5 minutes in pan, then transfer to a wire rack.

Topping and Assembly
Mix sugar and cinnamon in a medium bowl. Working one at a time, dip tops of muffins in melted butter, then cinnamon sugar.

Four Steps to Latke Love

latkes-blog
In my opinion, latkes are either great or not worth eating. One or the other. Crispy, slightly salty, no greasy aftertaste, and full of potato and onion flavor are what come to mind for a great latke. Over the years I’ve tried many recipes and techniques and honestly the recipes only vary in marginal ways, like using flour or matzo meal as a thickener, schmaltz or oil for the fat, baking powder or none, but generally potatoes, onions, eggs, salt and oil yield a great product if made well.

GKC top 4 tips to create awesome crispy, crunchy, delicious tasting latkes…

1. Squeeze out the liquid: Place the grated potato mixture in a kitchen towel and aggressively wring out as much liquid as possible. This concentrates flavor and prevents sogginess.

2. Switch up the fat: If you can find schmaltz (chicken fat), use it, it adds flavor. Blend it with vegetable oil (you need the oil’s high smoke point) for frying.

3. Test the temp: If your oil is too hot, you’ll burn the outside of the latke before it cooks through. If it’s too cool, the potatoes will soak up the oil. Medium-high heat is just right for achieving a beautiful crust. To tell, whether the oil is ready, drop, in a bit of the mixture. If it sizzles, start frying.

4. Keep them crisp: Unless you want to stand at the cooktop while everyone eats, you will need to keep a few batches hot while making the rest. Place the cooked latkes on a wire rack in a 325 degree oven which prevents them from sitting in their grease and lets heat circulate to keep that crunch.

What to do with used frying oil?

Reuse it. I don’t reuse my frying oil but if yours remains clear and light in color, you can extend its life by straining out the crumbs and storing it after its cooled.

Discard It. Don’t pour used frying oil down the drain. Instead, let it cool, pour it into a biodegradable container, such as a paper milk carton, and throw it out with your regular trash.

Try this Heirloom Latkes recipe.

Giveaway: Gluten-Free Around the World Cookbook

gv-glutenfree
Just in time for Chanukah…
Gluten-Free Around the World

Need a gift for someone who follows a gluten-free diet, or someone who enjoys travel and inspirational food? Gluten-Free Around the World is the perfect option. GKC has one to give away, but make sure you read all about it in the blog and catch the sneak-peak recipes too.

Submit to Win!

To enter to win the Gluten-Free Around the World Cookbook either:
1. Subscribe.
2. If you are already a subscriber, send us a comment. We love to hear your thoughts and ideas.
3. Follow us on Twitter or tweet about this post to your followers

Winter Wines to Keep Your Eye On

winterwines
Chase away the winter blues…Try some of Jay Buchsbaum’s winter wine suggestions

Ah, the winter.

As much as we keep our layers light and our heat off, there’s no denying the temperature is rapidly dropping. The good news? A change in season means switching up your wine selection.

“When it gets cold and it comes to food, we want comfort food: stuff that’s warm, inviting, easy to eat, richer in flavor,” says Wine Educator Jay Buchsbaum. “Wine is not much different.”

Since we’re always looking to pair what we drink with what we eat, it’s important to seek out wines that complement the comfort food as opposed to overpower it –or vice versa.

“I’m big on white wines,” Jay says. “I tell the community at large, we’re so hyper focused on red wines, and we should be confused more on whites. They’re so versatile and amenable to so many lighter foods, foods we eat during the week. But come the winter season, when dishes get heavier and richer, lighter more nuanced white wines often don’t stand up.”

The alternative? Wines that fill up your stomach and your palate. Jay’s choice? Late harvest reds, big and bold spicy cabernets. Because the sugars in these late harvests are higher, so is the alcohol content. “We look for wines that are as full in body as they are in spirit, if you will.”

And let’s not forget dessert. “The fun part about comfort foods is the sweet stuff you have at the end of the meal, and that goes for wines too! When pairing wines to desserts, you want to match the sweetness. With a heavy rich dark chocolate desserts try ports, sauternes which are sweeter, richer and thicker; but be careful they are very often higher in alcohol too.”

So what does a comforting meal with Jay entail?

Something hot and salty, like a pastrami sandwich. Pair it with Herzog Reserve Napa Cabernet. The flavor is typical Napa, big fruit flavor.

A beef stew or a lamb dish, spiced, but not too peppery. Try Flam Reserve Cabernet from Israel.

And for dessert: a hot chocolate melt down cake, which pairs perfectly with Porto Cordavero, a delicious Portuguese Port.

Yum. Who wouldn’t want to eat a meal with Jay?

 

Cabernet Braised Short Ribs with Fall Root Vegetables and Fried Onions

cabernetribs
Serves 6

1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon coriander
½ teaspoon ground ginger1/2 teaspoon cumin
½ teaspoon smoked paprika
½ teaspoon black pepper
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
¼ teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons canola oil
5 – 6 lbs. bone-in short ribs
1 onion, cut into chunks
2 carrots cut into 1-inch pieces
2 celery stalks, cut into 1-inch pieces
2 cloves garlic
1 teaspoon fresh thyme
1 (6 ounce) can tomato paste
1 ½ cups cabernet sauvignon wine
2 cups beef stock
6 cups assorted vegetables, like parsnips, sweet potatoes, carrots, turnips), cut into 1-inch dice
2 tablespoons olive oil
¾ cup fried onions, like French’s

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a small bowl, stir salt through cinnamon (all spices). Rub spice mixture evenly onto short ribs on all sides. Heat 1 tablespoon canola oil in a large heavy pot over medium heat, until very hot. Brown on each side, about 8 minutes per side, working in batches. Remove meat from pot. Add remaining canola oil and cook onion, carrot, celery and garlic, about 5 minutes. Add thyme and tomato paste, cook, stirring frequently, about 4 minutes. Return meat to pot, add wine, and beef stock. Add more stock if necessary, until beef is almost covered but not completely submerged. Bring to a simmer, cover and bake in oven until meat is tender about 3 hours.

In a separate roasting pan, toss vegetables with olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. During last 45 minutes of cooking, roast vegetables for 45 minutes. When meat is removed from oven, increase oven temperature to 400. Roast vegetables an additional 15-20 minutes.

If desired, puree meat sauce with an immersion blender. Serve meat with vegetables and sauce. Sprinkle with fried onions.

Hanukkah Recipes, Tips, Essentials, Wines and Articles

Hanukkah
Hanukkah o Hanukkah, is around the corner. Are your menorah’s polished? Are you ready for some frying? I feel like I just cleaned up from Succos and finished my pumpkin pie from Thanksgiving, but I guess that is what keeps us going, the celebrations that bring light and joy into our families and homes.

In order to get ready for Hanukkah, I’m often asked about recipes, articles and tips that were previously posted. I like to send at least one roundup piece so that you can find everything and anything you might need all in one place. So here goes…

Looking for:
Latke recipes? Latke recipe roundup right here
Latke Essentials, get all the tools and equipment for perfect latkes
Latke Freezing Tips
Hanukkah Cookies, Jewel cookies
It’s doughnut time, get the recipes here
Lighten Up, lighter doughnuts for all tastes, 3 different kinds
Doughnut making essentials, get all the tools and essentials here
Homemade Applesauce
Kosher chefs light up Chanukah with their favorite recipes
Eight Wines for Eight Nights of Chanukah AND more Chanukah Wines
Almond and Olive Oil Cake
The Dreidel Game, the official one
Chanukah Music by Sam Glaser

Moroccan Carrot Salad

carrot-salad
Recipe courtesy of Barbara Bensoussan

Serves 6
1 pound fresh carrots, peeled, the ends cut off, cut in halves
1 ½ tablespoons oil
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1 clove garlic, run through a press
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon cumin
¼ teaspoon hot paprika or cayenne (or to taste)
½ teaspoon tomato paste (optional)
Salt
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley or cilantro

Cook the carrots in a pot of boiling water until tender but not mushy, about fifteen minutes. While carrots are boiling, mix remaining ingredients together in a bowl (or plastic container with a lid if you’re planning to store them). When carrots are cooked, drain and cover with cold water to cool. When cool enough to handle, cut into coins and toss with the dressing. If you like you can cut them with one of those wavy knives that create a corrugated texture.

Moroccan Sfeng (Donuts)

sfeng-donuts
Recipe courtesy of Barbara Bensoussan

Serves 10

2 packages dry yeast (about 4 ½ teaspoons)
1 tablespoon sugar
3 cups warm water
1 teaspoon salt
7 cups all-purpose flour
Vegetable oil for frying

Dissolve yeast and sugar in the water in a large bowl. When yeast begins to foam, add the salt and flour and knead gently to form a very light, soft dough. (If dough is too wet, add more flour; if too dry, add a little more water.) Cover and let rise for two hours.

Heat two inches of oil in a large frying pan (to about 375 degrees–you can use a candy thermometer to check). Without punching down the dough, pull off small balls of dough, make a generous hole in the center (the surrounding dough will rise and fill in fast during frying). Let rise another 15 minutes and fry in the hot oil (turn doughnuts over when bottom becomes golden). Drain on paper towels; dust with confectioner’s sugar and serve with assorted jams and honey.

Chicken With Olives

chicken-olives
Recipe courtesy of Barbara Bensoussan

Serves 6
2 tablespoons olive oil or cooking oil
1 onion, diced
6 cloves of garlic, peeled, coarsely chopped
1 teaspoon turmeric
3-4 pounds chicken pieces (bottoms work well, but you can use the whole chicken)
Salt, pepper
1 teaspoon cumin
½ teaspoon thyme
1 teaspoon za’atar (optional)
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 can green olives
½ lemon, cut into about six pieces
¼ cup fresh parsley or cilantro

Saute onion in the oil for a few minutes over medium high heat, until transparent; add garlic. Add the turmeric and blend until the oil is uniformly yellow. Raise the heat slightly and add the chicken pieces, browning them on each side (2-3 minutes a side). As you brown the pieces, sprinkle them with the salt, pepper, cumin, thyme and za’atar.
Now add two cups of water, the tomato paste, the drained olives, and the lemon pieces. Partially cover and simmer over medium-low heat for one hour, until the chicken is tender and most of the liquid has evaporated (add more water if it evaporates too fast and begins to burn). Sprinkle with parley or cilantro and serve over rice or couscous.

Note: If you want to be really authentic, you can use preserved lemon pieces instead of fresh ones.

Fried Eggplant Salad

eggplantsalad
Recipe courtesy of Barbara Bensoussan

Serves 6
1 large eggplant (long and thin is better than short and fat for this recipe)
Salt
Cooking oil
1 red pepper, charred on all sides on the stove, cooled, peeled, and cut into dice
1 clove garlic
Juice of half a lemon
1 tablespoon chopped parsley or cilantro for garnish
Salt, pepper to taste

Cut the eggplant (unpeeled) into thin slices and sprinkle with salt. Let sit for twenty minutes, then dry any excess moisture with paper towels. Heat oil in a saucepan until piping hot, then fry slices golden brown on both sides, adding more oil as necessary. Mix in remaining ingredients gently and serve.
Variation: Cut eggplant into chunks instead of slices and fry in a deeper pot.

Guest Blog by My Friend Barbara Bensoussan, author of The Well-Spiced Life

an authentic food memoir that combines the best of pleasure reading with excellent recipes

Hello to all you Gourmet Kosher Cooks! A Moroccan Chanuka Menu For You…

Let me introduce myself: My name is Barbara Bensoussan, and I began my adult life as a mild-mannered Nice Jewish Girl from Philadelphia, working on a doctorate in psychology and minding my own business. But then, contrary to everyone’s expectations—mine included—my life took a 180-degree turn when I became Shabbos-observant and met and married a Nice Jewish Boy from…Casablanca.

Oy vey! We settled in Brooklyn, that crossroads of culture, and my cooking became a hodge-podge of cuisines from Morocco, Syria, Persia and yes, Eastern Europe. I spent the next twenty years absorbing new styles of cooking (quite literally—I have the pounds to prove it!) while raising a family. I’ve recounted the details of my often-bumbling foray into the world of Sephardic food and culture in a new book, The Well-Spiced Life (Israel Bookshop), sharing both experiences and recipes.

Below are a few samples from the Moroccan recipes, enough to make an entire menu if you add perhaps a little matbucha with the salads and some couscous with the chicken. With the fried eggplant and fried donuts, it’s perfect for Chanukah, the Festival of Oil!
Moroccan Carrot Salad
Fried Eggplant Salad
Chicken with Olives
Morrocan Sfeng (Donuts)

And if you enjoy the recipes, try the book! It makes a great Chanukah gift.

A “Chappy Chanukah” to all,

Barbara Bensoussan

What Kind of Wine to Serve for Thanksgiving or Bring to a Turkey Dinner?

turkeywine

A lot of people have been asking us, what kind of wine should I serve on Thanksgiving? It’s a complicated question, because the holiday can give way to a wide range of dishes and personalities alike.

“Thanksgiving is when a great diversity of humanity comes to your table,” says Jay Buchsbaum, Wine Educator. “You have the uninitiated wine taster, the serious business man, your cousin, the attorney.”

And, like the people at your table, the kinds of food you’re serving can be vastly different from each other. For Jay, one Thanksgiving wine isn’t enough. The good news? He has plenty of suggestions.

“A diversity of wines will not only satisfy a large group of people, but will be sure to go with each one of your dishes.”

So what kind of wines go well with the typical Thanksgiving fare?

In terms of taste, the typical Thanksgiving dish is the perfect marriage between savory and sweet, and needs a wine with that same measured flavor.

“For a dish that’s off-dry, like turkey and cranberry sauce, or yams, you need a wine that’s just a bit sweet, with good balance of acidity and fruit.” SUGGESTED WINE: Baron Herzog Chenin Blanc

If you’re looking for a real rarity, try an off-dry red, served chilled. This kind of red can stand up to flavor like mushrooms and shallots, yet still retain enough sweetness to match the food. SUGGESTED WINE: Jeunesse Cabernet. 100% Cabernet based, this wine uses amelioration (adding grape juice) to give it enough sugar while still maintaining character and depth.

Thanksgiving food is also known for being hearty. Let’s just say this meal isn’t for the weak of stomach. Try reaching for a robust Chardonnay. “I’m looking at chardonnays that have a rich sense of vanilla, oak, and body. The foods you have on Thanksgiving are full of texture and flavor, and a rich chardonnay will complement that.”
SUGGESTED WINES: Shiloh Chardonnay, Herzog Russian River Chardonnay

And, because, “It’s a celebration, after all!” you’re going to need something sparkling.
SUGGESTED WINES: For those with a sweet tooth at your table, pour Bartenura Spumante. Those looking for something more dry can taste Drappier Champagne.

Last, but certainly not least (just ask your grandmother), is dessert. A berry based or dark double chocolate dessert is typically great with a
port, while a lighter dessert, like ice cream or apple pie, goes well with a nice white wine.
SUGGESTED WINES: For port, try Psagot Prat. While technically not a port wine (it’s made in Israel, not Portugal) the darkly sweet, rich taste is still there. For the white wine, try lusciously sweet Piada Sauternes.

Whether you’re hosting a table of wine snobs or sipping novices, a colorful array of wines will be sure to please everybody at some point. Getting your whole family happy at the same time? Well, a person can dream.

Butternut Squash and Pear Soup

SOUL_SOUP
I was born in Redbank, New Jersey, then we moved to Pennsylvania, and then to Rochester, New York. Although I was young and do not remember that much about any of those places, my parents made some wonderful friends there (especially in Rochester), whom they are still in touch with today. Her dear friends, Judy and Richard Columbus now own a home in California and they spend their winters together. Judy recently made it into the local newspaper with her delicious Butternut Squash and Pear Soup recipe. Not only does Judy look great, but her soup is both Thanksgiving-worthy and weeknight worthy too. I added a sprinkle of cinnamon and pumpkin seeds to the top for a sweet and crunchy garnish.

DESERT SUN RECEIPE

Butternut Squash and Pear Soup
By Judy Columbus
Serves 6

2 Anjou or Bosc pears, peeled, cored and chopped
2 tart cooking apples, peeled, cored and chopped
Juice of 2 lemons
2 tablespoons olive oil
½ cup diced Vidalia or Spanish onions
3 cups or 24 ounces butternut squash, peeled, seeded and diced
1 carrot, peeled and diced
1½ tablespoons minced fresh garlic or 1 frozen garlic cube,
½ cup dry white wine
2 (14.5-ounce) cans vegetable or chicken broth
Few sprigs of fresh thyme, discard after cooking
½ teaspoon salt

Place pears and apples in a 2 quart bowl with lemon juice. Cover with water; set aside.
In a large saucepan over medium high heat, add oil. Add onions, sauté until translucent. Add squash, carrots and garlic. Drain liquid from 2 quart bowl and add pears and apples to the squash mixture. Add wine, broth, thyme and salt. Bring soup to a boil, turn down heat and simmer, covered, until squash is tender, about 20 minutes. Let cool slightly.
Transfer soup in batches to a blender; puree until smooth. Serve hot on a chilly winter’s eve or cold on a hot summer’s day.
Tips: Soup may be made ahead and refrigerated or frozen. Serve in soup bowls or mugs. Pour into tall cordial glasses, as a cold shooter. Garnish with a small sprig of savory or thyme.

Six Steps to Making Great Stuffing

  1. Start with Stale Bread: Use any type of bread, as long as it can get stale overnight. Drying it out overnight is key to flavor absorption and a good texture (soggy is not good). Torn bread instead of sliced promises extra toasty texture.
  2. Use some fat: You don’t have to add meat, but it does result in a nice savory stuffing. Brown the sausage or ground meat then use the drippings to cook the vegetables. This adds a nice kick and saltiness to the base.
  3. Use flavor-building ingredients: Sage, celery, and onion, leek, or shallots are nonnegotiable. These are the flavors of Thanksgiving. Cook until onions are golden brown.
  4. Deglaze away: Use a little wine or vinegar into the skillet, scraping and stirring to dissolve any crusted-on bits. Next, melt some margarine (this adds richness) into the mixture. This pairs well with the acidity from the wine.
  5. Stock is a must: Dry stuffing is awful and gummy stuffing equally as bad. Stock is a must, especially homemade if you have it. The bread should be moist with no dry spots but not sitting in liquid.
  6. Kick it up with add-ins: Now use your flair and palate. Look for balance when choosing add-ins. If you start with sweet cornbread, use tart dried cherries, or other dried fruit. Need crunch? Toss in nuts, pumpkin seeds, or chopped apples. I always finish it with some fresh herbs, like parsley, sage, basil or rosemary. And make sure you finish it with salt and pepper.

Need stuffing recipes? Try these stuffing recipes.

Kosherfest 2014

Kosherfest 2014 was fun, full of flavor and very fattening. From Jack’s Gourmet Sausage (you gotta try their new beef merguez, a show favorite by all), to gourmet choco- taschen ( pure caramel and chocolate shaped like a hamentaschen), they covered every food and flavor category. I skipped over a few granola, flatbread, and dairy-free, vegan baked goods because, it’s like candles at the gift show, just how many varieties are there? And instead saved my appetite for some new kosher products coming to your markets soon…and if you don’t see them, ask for them.

Here are some highlights and favorites this year…

Rugelach
Rugelach by Marzipan, what’s new here? Really rugelach? YES, really, these rugelach taste and look like “Israel shuk rugelach”,…you know the ones that come out of the oven oozing with chocolate or cinnamon. They are packaged tightly on a tray, warmed in the oven, and voila, Israel in your own home. Seriously, delicious.

teapops_frozen_treats_packaging_hero
Teapops, by Deebeesorganics.com, organic super fruits and teas, without refined sugar, then made into frozen delicious flavored ice pops. I loved the mango and coconut flavors. I’m definitely stocking these next summer in my freezer.

lovefruit
Move over Matt’s Munchies, hello, You Love Fruit. Better tasting dried pure fruit snacks, shaped in heart-sized bites in tons of flavors. Everything you expect like mango coconut, peach, Pomberry Acai, and more too, like key lime, passion fruit and carrot ginger. Coming soon.

moradwinery
Morad Winery not only brings us Pomegranate and Passion fruit wine but now also lychee and limoncello flavors. Gorgeous and delicious, and the friendliest owners ever.   GKC readers loved the wine for Rosh Hashannah, try some new flavors this winter too.

photo-blends
My gluten-free favorite item was easily, BLENDS, by Orly. She ingeniously created and packaged gluten free flour blends specific to the type of baking you are doing. She has a blend for breads, one for cookies, another for cakes, brownies and another for pizza doughs. Each is a special blend depending on the density and final consistency needed for your baking. Use as a one-to-one substitute to gluten based flour in all your recipes. I can’t wait to try it this week!

Tri-State party makers…try Toss It, Gourmet Salad Bar. Suri Engelberg, creator and chef for this company has created over 30 take-out salads in 2 different sizes for parties, Shabbos, weekday or anytime. Green salads, pasta salads, cabbage salads, grain salads and fruit salads are available, and the menu looks great. I tasted a few and really enjoyed the dressing and unique ingredients. Deliveries in some areas too. Check out her menu and pricing, it’s a great alternative to catering. Suri Engelberg 347 401 1920, no website yet.

A few other items, I’m looking forward to are the black truffle pate by La Rustichella , and the red curry paste by Thai Treat. I love Thai and Indian food so red and yellow curry pastes open up a world of flavors and recipes.

I’m looking forward to your feedback and what you liked at the event too. It’s a great food blogger meet and greet too. I loved sharing the day with Naomi Nachman, the Aussie Gourmet, Paula Shoyer, bestselling author of The Holiday Kosher Gourmet, my new friend Malkie Gordon from Kiss the Kosher Cook, Estee Kaffra from Kosher Scoop, Sara Lasry, best selling author of The Dairy Gourmet, Miriam Pascal from the Overtime Cook, Shifra Klein from Joy of Kosher magazine, and Leah Schapiro from CookKosher, and author of the The Made Easy Series, of Artscroll published cookbooks. Thanks fellow foodies and friends!

Thanksgiving Recipes, Tips and Wines

I’m a Thanksgiving lover as I’ve mentioned in previous years. I love the low-key happy nature of the holiday, the playing in the leaves, the football games, the delicious tastes and smells of the meal, and the leftovers too! Some years we get together with family and friends and some years I make the Shabbos meal Thanksgiving themed. Whatever your take on it is, no one can deny that the fall colors and ingredients in Thanksgiving cuisine are beloved by all. Check out all the Thanksgiving ideas and recipes from GKC.

And if you are new to GKC or just need a reminder, I’ve got lots of Thanksgiving and Turkey roasting tips and hints. Check out these past favorites.

Get Prepped for Thanksgiving, Perfect Turkey Roasting Tips and Tricks
Is a Kosher Turkey Really More Tasty?Thanksgiving Wines, What are you serving?3 Thanksgiving Wines we recommend
Win a Chefalarm, and check out all the best Thermometers from Thermoworks.

In addition to the new recipes for Thanksgiving, make sure you check out the
Turkey recipes
Stuffing recipes
Cranberry Sauce recipes
Mashed Potato recipes
Squash recipes
Green Bean recipes
Pie recipes

Or some leftover turkey ideas too:
Quick Chili with Leftover Turkey
Minestrone Soup with Leftover Turkey
Turkey Salad
Turkey Pie with Cranberry Thyme Crust

Pumpkin Tiramisu

Pumpkin Tiramisu Beauty A140728 FW Mastering My Mistakes Nov 2014
Serves 12

One 15-ounce can pumpkin puree
1/2 cup light brown sugar
3/4 teaspoon ground ginger
3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
3/4 cup granulated sugar
1 1/2 cups Tofutti cream cheese
2 1/2 cups pareve whipping cream
2 cups brewed coffee, cooled
Two 7-ounce packages dry ladyfingers
Chocolate shavings and candied ginger, for garnish, optional

In a large bowl, whisk the pumpkin puree with the brown sugar, ginger, cinnamon, salt, nutmeg and 1/2 cup of the granulated sugar. Add the tofutti cream cheese and 1 1/2 cups of the pareve whipping cream. Using an electric mixer, beat the pumpkin mixture at medium speed until soft peaks form; do not overbeat.

In a medium bowl, whisk the brewed coffee with 2 tablespoons of the granulated sugar until it’s dissolved. Dip both sides of 6 ladyfingers in the coffee and arrange them in a single layer in a 4-quart trifle dish. Spread 1 cup of the pumpkin mousse on top. Repeat the layering 5 more times, ending with a layer of the pumpkin mousse. Cover and refrigerate the tiramisu overnight.
In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat the remaining 1 cup of whipping cream with the remaining 2 tablespoons of granulated sugar until soft peaks form. Dollop the whipped cream over the tiramisu, garnish with shaved chocolate and candied ginger and serve.

Savory Carrot and Apple Soup

savory-carrotapplesoup

Serves 12
4 tablespoons margarine or oil
1 medium onion, chopped
1 medium leek, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced crosswise
1 medium fennel bulb, cored and chopped
Kosher salt
Pepper
2 pounds carrots, cut crosswise into 1/4-inch rounds
2 parsnips , peeled and cut in rounds
1 Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored and chopped
7 gingersnap cookies or 4 full graham crackers, plus ½ teaspoon dried ginger
1 tablespoon curry powder
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 teaspoon finely grated peeled fresh ginger
2 thyme sprigs
2 quarts chicken stock
1 cup Tofutti sour cream
1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
Toasted pumpkin seeds, for garnish

In a large saucepan, melt the margarine. Add the onion, leek, fennel and a generous pinch each of salt and pepper and cook over moderately high heat, stirring occasionally, until softened and just starting to brown, 9 minutes. Add the carrots, parsnip, apple, gingersnaps, curry powder, garlic, ginger and thyme and cook, stirring, until the carrots and celery root soften slightly, 10 minutes. Add the stock and bring to a boil. Simmer over moderate heat, stirring, until the vegetables are very tender, 25 minutes. Discard the thyme sprigs.
With an immersion blender, puree the soup in a blender with the Tofutti sour cream and vinegar until smooth. Reheat the soup if necessary and season with salt and pepper. Ladle the soup into bowls, top with toasted pumpkin seeds and serve.

Cornbread, Sausage, Cherry, and Pecan Stuffing

cornbread-cherry-and-pecan-stuffing
Serves 8

¾ cup (1½ sticks) margarine, cut into pieces, divided plus more
¼ cup white wine vinegar
½ cup dried tart cherries
10 cups coarsely crumbled cornbread, dried out overnight
⅓ cup coarsely chopped pecans, toasted
¼ cup olive oil
1 pound kielbasa, Italian sausage or other sausage, optional
2 medium onions, chopped
4 celery stalks, chopped
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh sage
2 large eggs
3 cups chicken stock or low-sodium chicken broth, divided
¼ cup finely chopped fresh parsley

Preheat oven to 400°. Grease a shallow 3-qt. baking dish and a sheet of foil. Bring vinegar and 2 tablespoons water to a boil in a small saucepan; remove from heat and add cherries. Let sit until cherries are plump, 15–20 minutes.
Meanwhile, spread out cornbread on a rimmed baking sheet and toast until golden brown, 10–15 minutes. Let cool. Place in a very large bowl.
Drain cherries, reserving soaking liquid, and add cherries to bowl with cornbread (do not mix).
Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high. Cook kielbasa/sausage, stirring occasionally and breaking into small pieces with a spoon, until browned and cooked through, 8–10 minutes. Transfer to bowl with a slotted spoon.
Add onions and celery to skillet, season with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring often, until onions are golden brown and soft, 10–12 minutes. Add garlic and sage; cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Transfer to bowl.
Reduce heat to medium and cook reserved cherry soaking liquid in skillet, scraping up any browned bits, until almost all evaporated, about 1 minute. Add ½ cup margarine; cook, stirring, until melted. Drizzle over bread mixture.
Whisk eggs and 2 cups stock in a medium bowl; pour over cornbread mixture. Add parsley, season with salt and pepper, and gently toss, adding more stock ¼-cupful at a time as needed (you may not use it all), until combined and cornbread is hydrated. Mix carefully to avoid breaking cornbread into crumbs. Transfer to prepared dish and dot with remaining ¼ cup margarine.
Cover with greased foil; bake until a paring knife inserted into the center comes out hot, 30–35 minutes. Increase oven temperature to 450°. Uncover and bake until top is golden brown and crisp, 20–25 minutes. Let sit 10 minutes before serving.
DO AHEAD: Stuffing can be assembled 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.

Fruit and Spice Cranberry Sauce

fruit-spice-cranberry-sauce
Makes 3 cups

8 ounces fresh or frozen cranberries
1/2 cup raisins
1/2 cup golden raisins
1/2 cup dried tart cherries or craisins
1/4 cup chopped dried apricots
1 cinnamon stick (about 3 in. long)
1 wide piece lemon peel (about 3 in. long)
1 wide piece orange peel (about 3 in. long)
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

Put all ingredients and 1 1/2 cups water in a medium saucepan. Simmer over low heat, stirring often, until cranberries have popped, flavors are developed, and dried fruit has softened, about 30 minutes. Let cool, then spoon into a serving bowl and chill until ready to take to the party (remove citrus peels and cinnamon stick before serving). Can be made up to 2 -3 days ahead of serving.

Sweet Potato and Pecan Pie

sweet-potato-pecan-pie-1114-l
Serves 12

1/2 recipe Pie Crust, see recipe below or store-bought

FILLING
2-1/4 pounds orange-fleshed sweet potatoes, such as Garnet (sometimes called “yams”)
3 large eggs
2/3 cup packed light brown sugar
1/3 cup granulated sugar
3 tablespoons pareve whipping cream
3 tablespoons melted margarine
2 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

PECAN TOPPING
2 tablespoons packed light brown sugar
1 tablespoon dark corn syrup
1 tablespoon melted margarine
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 cup coarsely chopped pecans

Make pastry as directed in a regular 9-in. pie pan. Let cool.

Preheat oven to 375° and make filling: Bake sweet potatoes in a shallow pan until very tender when pierced, 1 1/4 to 1 3/4 hours. Let cool. Scoop flesh into a food processor and purée until smooth. Measure 2 cups; save extra for soup or another use.

Reduce oven to 350°. With a mixer, beat eggs in a large bowl until frothy. Beat in remaining filling ingredients until blended. Pour into crust and spread level. Wrap pie rim with 4 strips of foil.

Bake pie 30 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, stir together topping ingredients except pecans until smooth. Stir in pecans.

Remove foil from pie. Evenly drop small spoonfuls of pecan mixture in a border around edge of pie. Continue to bake until center jiggles only slightly when shaken gently, 15 to 20 minutes. Let cool on a rack at least 2 hours.
Make ahead: Through step 2 or the whole pie, up to 1 day.

Pie crust
2 1/2 cups flour
1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
4 tablespoons cold vegetable shortening
10 tablespoon cold unsalted margarine, cut into 1/2-in. cubes

In a mixer, beat flour, sugar, and salt on low speed to blend. Add shortening in spoonfuls and beat on low speed until pieces are pea-size, about 1 minute. Add margarine and beat until pieces are pea-size, stopping once to scrape bowl, about 2 1/2 minutes. Gradually drizzle in 5 1/2 tbsp. ice water, beating just until dough comes together, 15 to 30 seconds.

Divide mixture in half and gently gather and press each into a 3/4-in.-thick disk. Wrap each in plastic wrap. Chill until firm, at least 2 hours and up to 2 days.

Unwrap 1 pastry disk and lightly flour pastry, work surface, and rolling pin (save remaining disk for another use). Working from center with short strokes, roll pastry into an even 12-in. circle. As you work, lift pastry using a bench scraper or long metal spatula, and reflour board and pin as needed to keep it from sticking.

Fold pastry in half and open up into a regular 9-in. pie pan, easing it into place without stretching. Using scissors, trim overhang to 1 in.

Roll overhang under itself so it’s flush with and sitting on top of rim. Pinch pastry along lip to form an even ridge. Flute ridge. Wrap with plastic wrap and freeze until firm, 30 to 40 minutes.

Preheat oven to 400° with a rack in lower third. Line pastry with foil, letting ends come straight up from pan but not over rim. Fill with pie weights or dried beans. Bake until crust is golden at edges, 20 to 25 minutes. Remove foil and weights. If needed, bake until center is dry, 2 to 5 more minutes.
Make ahead: For dough, up to 2 days, chilled or 1 month, frozen. For blind-baked crust, up to 1 day, airtight.