Pecan Cinnamon Rolls

Filling
4 tablespoons unsalted margarine or butter, softened
3/4 cup chopped pecans
6 tablespoons dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

Cream Cheese Glaze
1 cup powdered (confectioners’) sugar
1/2 cup (4 ounces) pareve tofutti cream cheese or cream cheese
4 tablespoons unsalted margarine or butter, softened
1 teaspoon vanilla
4 tablespoons pareve milk, soymilk, or regular milk
Melted margarine or butter, for brushing

Directions
After the dough comes together, on a well-floured surface, using a lightly floured rolling pin, roll out the dough to a 15 by 11-inch rectangle. In a mixing bowl add the pecans, brown sugar, and cinnamon.

Spread the softened unsalted margarine over the dough leaving a 1/2-inch border. Sprinkle the cinnamon sugar evenly over the dough. Starting with the long side, roll up the dough tightly ending with the seam-side down. Cut 10 slices each about 1/2-inch thick.

Place in 2 (9 by 13-inch) greased baking dishes and cover with a kitchen towel. Allow the rolls to rise in a warm environment for an additional 15 to 20 minutes. Brush with melted margarine before baking

Bake at 400 degrees F until the tops are golden brown, about 25 to 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and brush tops with melted margarine and cool on cooling rack. Drizzle with prepared pareve cream cheese glaze.

Pareve Cream Cheese Glaze: In a mixing bowl, combine the powdered sugar, pareve cream cheese, margarine, pareve milk, and vanilla.

Rapid Rolls
3 (0.25-ounce) packets active dry yeast
1 3/4 cups warm water
1/2 cup honey
1/2 cup melted margarine, plus more for brushing
2 teaspoons salt, plus more for sprinkling
2 large eggs, beaten
4 to 6 cups flour, plus more if needed

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the instant yeast, and warm water. Let it activate for 5 minutes until bubbly. Stir in the honey.

On low speed, add 1/2 cup melted margarine, 2 teaspoons salt, and eggs. Slowly add the flour cup-by-cup until fully incorporated and the dough pulls away from the sides of the mixing bowl. Add more flour if it is too sticky.

Portion the dough into 24 even servings. Form the rolls into desired shape and let rise approximately 20 minutes, or until doubled in size. Place the rolls in a cast iron skillet or on a baking sheet. Brush the rolls with melted margarine.

Bake for 25 minutes until the tops are golden brown. Remove from the oven and brush with more melted margarine, and sprinkle with a little salt.

Chocolate Truffles

You don’t have to celebrate Valentine’s Day to notice that chocolate is in the air!! (Well, flowers too but this is a cooking site!) I was debating whether to try my hand at some molten chocolate cakes or go for the more direct experience – Godiva, anyone (for chalav yisrael options, try Le Chocolatier. My favorite chocolates are usually the truffles (well, truth be told, I like the caramel and nut options also…) so I decided to save the trip to the store and try to make my own. It was a little messy but the results were worth it.

I made Mocha Truffles, Peanut Butter Truffles and Chocolate Truffles. After dipping in chocolate, truffles can be left alone or rolled in crushed nuts, coconut, sprinkles, cocoa, powdered sugar…

Mocha Truffles

2 (12 ounce) packages semisweet chocolate chips
1 (8 ounce) package tofutti cream cheese
3 tablespoons instant coffee granules
2 teaspoons water

Melt chocolate chips and stir until smooth. Stir in tofutti cream cheese, coffee and water until completely blended. Shape into 1-inch balls and place on waxed paper-lined cookie sheet. Chill for about 1 hour. Dip in chocolate coating; then roll in topping of your choice if desired.

Chocolate Coating:
2 cups (1 12-ounce package) semisweet chocolate chips
2 tablespoons shortening

Melt in microwave and stir until smooth.

Peanut Butter Truffles

1 cup margarine, softened
1 cup crunchy peanut butter
2 tablespoons vanilla
3-1/2 cups powdered sugar
2 cups graham cracker crumbs

Cream together margarine, peanut butter and vanilla. Mix in remaining ingredients and beat until smooth. Shape into balls and place on waxed paper-lined cookie sheets. Chill for 1 hour before dipping in chocolate coating and rolling in other toppings (chopped peanuts works nicely here)

Plain Chocolate Truffles


There is actually nothing plain about this taste.

2 cups (1 12-ounce package) semisweet chocolate chips
1 cup pareve whip
1/3 cup margarine, softened
1 teaspoon vanilla

Heat chocolate chips and pareve whip in microwave. Stir until smooth. Stir in margarine and vanilla. Cool, cover and refrigerate for a few hours. Shape into balls and place on waxed paper-lined baking sheets. Refrigerate for an additional hour before dipping in chocolate coating and rolling in toppings.

New Kosher Restaurant Guide on GKC!!


How many times have you been travelling and desperately needed a complete list of kosher restaurants in the area? Or even just wondered whether any new kosher restaurants have opened up in your hometown? Most big cities will have some information available online for their kosher communities, but the hassle of having to look up a location’s individual list of kosher restaurants can be time-consuming and frustrating, especially since even if you manage to find that, you still won’t know whether you can trust the certification, or even if it’s any good.

Have no fear – Gourmet Kosher Cooking is proud to introduce our new user-friendly comprehensive Kosher Restaurant Guide!

Here are some of the helpful and unique features you’ll find in our guide:
o Search by state and city (USA and some countries like Canada and France – more international locations coming soon!)
o Certification/hashgacha information WITH contacts and phone numbers
o Meat vs. dairy status
o Short description of type of food
o Location and phone number
o Hours of operation
o Website
o Online menu where available
o User comments for reviews

Whether you’re looking for a kosher restaurant in NYC, New Jersey kosher restaurants, kosher restaurants in LA, Chicago, Boston, even far-off states like Nebraska and Kentucky – you’ll find a place to eat using our guide. And of course, if you find a great spot that’s not yet on the guide, let us know about it so we can continue to expand and include every option.

You’ll find the Kosher Restaurant Guide on the right-hand side of your Gourmet Kosher Cooking screen. You can start searching right away by selecting a state from the drop-down menu, or click the link to the main page of the guide. Don’t forget to leave your comments and reviews if you’ve tried one of the kosher restaurants on the list – we’re all curious to know what you think.

Mandelbroit or Biscotti

Whatever you call them, they taste great and I am addicted. I make my “famous” Cinnamon Chocolate Chip Mandelbroit for almost any occasion – mishloach manos, bake sales, thank yous, because it’s Tuesday…But I also like to experiment with new and different kinds. And I have to confess that I am pretty much insatiable. Some of my recent favorites and the ones now filling my freezer include:

Ginger Mandelbroit
Snickerdoodle Biscotti (I’m just varying the name!)
Chocolate Biscotti
Apricot-Almond Mandelbroit

And I really wish Pat’s restaurant in Los Angeles would share their recipe. They’re the perfect dessert – not too sweet (so obviously not too many calories) and lots of crunch and flavor. If anyone can wheedle it out of them…

Snickerdoodle Biscotti

½ cup margarine, softened
½ cup sugar
½ cup brown sugar
2-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon cinnamon
½ teaspoon ginger
½ teaspoon nutmeg
2 eggs
1 egg yolk
1 teaspoon vanilla
3-1/4 cups flour
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 egg white
1 tablespoon water
Cinnamon-Sugar mixture

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cream together margarine and sugars until flurry. Add baking powder and spices. Beat in eggs, egg yolk and vanilla. On a low speed, mix in flour and nuts. Divide dough in half and shape into logs. Place on ungreased cookie sheet. Beat together egg white and water and brush atop flattened logs. Sprinkle with cinnamon-sugar. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes – until lightly browned. Cool slightly, slice and return to oven for about 10 minutes – until center is just dry. Cool on wire rack.

Chocolate Biscotti

½ cup margarine, softened
1 cup sugar
2-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
2 eggs
1 egg yolk
2 tablespoons soy milk or nondairy creamer
½ cup cocoa powder
2-3/4 cups flour
½ cup semisweet chocolate chips (regular or miniature)
½ cup chopped toasted almonds (optional)
1 egg white
1 teaspoon water
2 tablespoons sugar

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cream together margarine and sugar. Add baking powder, eggs, yolk and creamer. Mix well. Beat in cocoa and flour. Stir in chocolate chips and nuts, if using. Divide dough in half and shape into logs. Place on lightly greased cookie sheet. Combine egg white and water and brush on top of logs. Sprinkle with sugar. Bake for about 25 minutes and cool slightly. Slice and return to oven for about 10 minutes. Cool on wire rack.

Ginger Mandelbroit

½ cup margarine, softened
¾ cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons molasses
2 eggs
2-1/4 cups flour
2 teaspoons ginger (ground)
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
½ cup minced crystallized ginger

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Cream together margarine and sugar. Beat in molasses and eggs. On a low speed, add flour, ground ginger and baking powder. Mix well Stir in fresh ginger and crystallized ginger. Take a deep breath and enjoy the aroma. Divide dough in half and form into logs. Place on ungreased baking sheet and bake for about 25 minutes. Cool briefly and slice. Return to oven for 5 to 10 minutes – until inside is just dry. Col on rack.

Apricot-Almond Mandelbroit

6 tablespoons margarine, softened
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
½ teaspoon vanilla
1-1/3 cups flour
½ teaspoon baking powder
¾ cup diced dried apricots
2/3 cup toasted slivered almonds
2/3 cup semisweet chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly grease 2 baking sheets. Cream together margarine and sugar. Beat in eggs and vanilla. Mix in flour and baking powder, and then remaining ingredients. Divide into four, form into flattened logs and place on the prepared sheets. Sprinkle with sugar. Bake for 20 minutes, remove from oven and cut into then pieces. Return to oven for 5 more minutes, then remove to rack to cool.

Kosher Food and Wine Experience

Great news! The Kosher Food and Wine Experience is back! Remember, last year I wrote about it? I could not stop raving about the fantastic food, great chefs, amazing wines, and all the GKC friends that we had fun with. This year I hope you will join us for the fun. The Kosher Food and Wine Experience is back and we can’t wait to attend on February 22nd, Pier 60 in Chelsea Piers in NYC. This year the show brings all the new and old wines we love to tell you about, like the TerradiSetta, Chianti Classico from the new winery in Tuscany, the highly touted Covenant C, and the Flechas de los Andes, Gran Malbec. Literally hundreds of labels will be served and tasted and experts are everywhere for new and old wine lovers to ask questions, give comments, or just be seen with.

The food this year is just fantastic! We are GKC so we just love the new restaurant additions to this event. I personally can’t wait to see what chef Moshe Wendel serves (formerly of Basil and now the chef at the new restaurant Pardes). Shhh! We hope to get a sneak peak at the menus and share them with you next week. GKC foodies like to know what to look forward to. Other exciting additions include GKC favorites Shalom Bombay, Le Marais, Prime Grill, and Solo. Pacing and a big, happy appetite seem to be the best strategy for this event.

Sound fun? It is! So come with us! The Kosher Food and Wine Experience appreciates our enthusiasm and has extended a coupon for $20 off each ticket for GKC readers. Use code GKC20 at checkout on www.kfwe2011.com

But don’t wait; this coupon is only good until January 31, 2011.

We would love to personally greet you there so let us know if you are coming!!!!

Tu B’Shvat

Tu B’Shvat is coming tomorrow. Here are some extra recipes to add to your repertoire and contribute to the festive and grateful spirit of the day. This year in particular, it is a mitzvah to plant a tree to replace forests that were destroyed. The first recipe is courtesy Dana Slatkin, professionally-trained chef, cookbook author and friend.

Warm Brie-Stuffed Dates
Fig and Walnut Biscotti

Warm Brie-Stuffed Dates

Serves 6-8, depending on how hungry your guests are

12 ounces (about 16-20) dates with pits (preferably Medjool)
4 ounces Brie cheese, rind removed
16-20 dry-roasted walnut halves, candied pecans, or pistachios

1. Preheat the oven to 325° F.
2. Slit the dates open lengthwise and remove the pits and stems.
3. Stuff about 1/2 teaspoon of cheese inside each date and close the sides loosely, mounding the cheese on top of each date. Top each with your choice of nut. Place the dates on a non-stick baking tray.
4. Bake the dates for 6-8 minutes until the cheese is melted and the dates are hot. Arrange on a platter and serve immediately.

The second recipe is from us, your friends at gourmetkoshercooking.com.

Fig and Walnut Biscotti

This is adapted from a recipe by Martha Stewart. It is a very dry biscotti, more adult than the chocolate chip version and perfectly suited for morning or afternoon tea (or coffee).

1 cup whole wheat flour
¾ cup flour
¾ cup brown sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
3 eggs
1 cup coarsely chopped dried figs
1 cup chopped toasted walnuts

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Whisk together flours, brown sugar and baking powder. In a separate bowl, whisk eggs for about 5 minutes. Fold into flour mixture until combined. Stir in figs and walnuts. Lightly grease a parchment or silpat-lined cookie sheet. Divide dough in half and make 2 longs. Bake for about 25 minutes. Cut into slices. Reduce oven temperature to 300 degrees and bake an additional 10 minutes (approximately – watch them so they don’t get overdone). Transfer to a wire rack to finish cooling.

Tu B’shvat

This Thursday is Tu B’shvat, the Rosh Hashanah of the trees. It is customary to praise the land of Israel – “a land of wheat and barley and vines and fig trees and pomegranates, a land of olive trees and honey” (Deuteronomy 8) and to partake of its bounty. There is nothing like fresh figs or pomegranates or grapes. And then there are all those platters of dried fruit…Many home cooks struggle with trying to think of new and interesting fruity recipes for the holiday. Here are some Tu B’shvat recipes with fruit to help you enjoy the holiday and participate fully in praising the land.

Maple Date Bars
Dried Fruit and Nut Cookies
Lemon Garlic Olives
Moroccan Chickpeas
Cucumber Pomegranate Salad

Maple Date Bars

1-3/4 cups chopped dates
¾ cup water
1/3 cup maple syrup
2/3 cup sugar
½ cup margarine, softened
1 cup flour
1 cup old-fashioned oats
¼ teaspoon baking soda

Combine dates, water and maple syrup in a saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer for about 10 minutes, stirring frequently. Cool. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cream together margarine and sugar. Add dry ingredients and mix well. Remove 2 cups of batter and press into bottom of a greased 13 x 9-inch baking pan. Spread date mixture over crust. Sprinkle with remaining flour mixture. Bake for 20 minutes. Cool in pan on wire rack before cutting into bars. I like to store these in the refrigerator.

Lemon Garlic Olives

1 (21 ounce) jar pimento-stuffed olives
8 sprigs fresh oregano
6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
4 slices lemon
20 black peppercorns
6 tablespoons lemon juice

Drain olives, reserving liquid. Layer half each of olives, oregano, garlic, lemon slices and peppercorns in a 1-quart jar (you can use a plastic container if you are stuck). Repeat layers. Pour lemon juice into jar and add enough reserved liquid to fill. Cover and chill for at least 8 hours. Will keep in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

Spicy Chickpeas

Adapted from Cooking Light magazine

¼ cup olive oil
2 teaspoon minced garlic
1 red onion, thinly sliced
½ cup dried apricots, sliced
1 tablespoon garam masala
1 teaspoon salt
¾ teaspoon pepper
¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper
1 cinnamon stick
½ cup water
1-1/2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 (15 ounce) cans chick peas, drained
1 (28 ounce) can whole tomatoes, undrained
6 cups spinach, torn into 1-inch pieces
1 cup cilantro, chopped
½ cup roasted almonds, chopped

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add garlic and cook briefly. Add onion and spices (through cinnamon stick) and sauté for about 7 minutes, until onion is lightly browned. Add water, lemon juice, chick peas and tomatoes: bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally and breaking up tomatoes as you go. Stir in spinach and simmer briefly. Remove heat and sprinkle with cilantro and almonds. Serve over couscous.

Cucumber and Pomegranate Salad

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/3 cup olive oil
3 tablespoons champagne or white wine vinegar
Salt and pepper
2 large bulbs fennel, thinly sliced
1 English cucumber, thinly sliced
1 Granny Smith apple, thinly sliced
½ cup pomegranate seeds

Combine lemon juice, oil, salt and pepper and shake well. On a serving platter, layer fennel, cucumber and apple. Drizzle with dressing and sprinkle pomegranate seeds on top.

Soups


The Secret to Surviving the Winter: Healthy and Filling Soups

It’s winter time. It’s either cold or snowing or raining or all of the above!! We asked our healthy and nutrition writer, Simone Stromer, MD, CHC [AADP]
www.nutritionthroughlife.com to give us some tips for healthy winter eating. Read on.

During winter, chances are that you are craving more comfort foods, generally those packed with excess fat and calories. Soups are now the most important meal to add to your diet because they are the ultimate food to warm your body and fill you up with all the nutrients that you need while being relatively low in calories and processed ingredients. In Japan, where there are low rates of obesity, miso soup with nutritious seaweed and soy beans is commonly a daily part of the diet, and is even prepared for breakfast. Soups are also the ultimate meal-in-a-bowl; a large bowl paired with a piece of crusty whole grain or sour dough bread can keep you going for hours.

Here are some tips for getting the most out of your winter soups:

Soup is an excellent way to pack in a few of those high-nutrient/high-fiber food groups– whole grains (like rice and barley), vegetables (any kind), and beans (like chickpeas, red kidney beans and lentils). Adding these to your soups will turn a simple vegetable soup into a balanced meal.

Ultra-low calorie soups (like plain tomato soup, low-fat minestrone soup without pasta, or non-dairy carrot-ginger soup) can be used as snack foods—you can eat the soup slowly and the large amount of liquid will fill you up, preventing you from reaching for the piece of bread, bag of nuts, or potato chips that you may have wanted.

It is preferable that soups are made from vegetable, chicken, or beef broths and kept clear, with the exception of adding tomato paste or stewed tomatoes for extra flavor. If you buy store-bought soup stock or broth, try to avoid those with MSG and more than 100 mg of sodium per serving.

If you want to add a touch of creaminess to your soup, avoid high-fat creamers like heavy cream or half and half and artificial creamers and instead try low-fat sour cream, low-fat milk or soy milk in small quantities. Add the low-fat options to your soup at the end of cooking to avoid boiling them.

For a dairy meal, try adding a sprinkle of shredded low-fat cheese or parmesan to the top of your vegetable soup.

Soup is not only healthy, but it is delicious as well. My family loves the minestrone with homemade white bread or with pasta and some grated mozzarella. Try a bunch and let your family discover their favorite.

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Kosher Pie Crusts

I have always been intimidated by pie crusts. The dough sticks to the cutting board. The dough sticks to the rolling pin. It becomes a big mess and I usually end up patting it down into the pan, gamely trying to attach all the pieces to form one cohesive whole. Additionally every recipe seems to say that the best pie crusts use lard – a definite no-no – or butter, which is very limiting. How could I possibly make a good kosher pie crust? I gave up and just bought the frozen version. “Did you make this?” my guests would ask. “Define this”, I would respond…Until my friend, Debby, came to my rescue. One private lesson in crust making and my life was changed! And look at this beautiful pecan pie we made. I forced everyone in my family to ooh and aah. Just follow these easy instructions and your family will do the same.


Pecan Pie


Pecan Pie

Crust:
Adapted from Martha Stewart Pies and Tarts
This is enough for two pie crusts – make one pie for now, and freeze one for later!
2-1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt (I usually leave salt out when I am baking but since this was out of my league I put it in)
2 sticks unsalted margarine, cut into tablespoon-size pieces
About 1/3 cup cold water (just from the tap, no ice cubes involved)

Place flour, salt and margarine in the bowl of a food processor. Using the steel blade, pulse to combine. You should get pea-sized pieces. Add water and process VERY BRIEFLY to form one main lump, surrounded by lots of little pieces of dough. Gather it together to form a ball. Cut in half and let the dough rest a few minutes (you can start pulling together your filling ingredients) Roll out the dough between two large pieces of plastic wrap – this seems to be the secret (or at least one of them!) Keep the dough completely covered with plastic wrap so that none of it actually touches the rolling pin or the counter (or your kitchen table, as was my case). Remove the top layer of wrap and gently put the crust down in a pie pan – I used these ruffled ones that happen to be designed by the same friend!) Using extra dough hanging down, pinch the edges. Then, push your index finger in at whatever spacing you like, all the way around, to form the fluting. Voilà! Pour in filling. If you have any extra dough and you have any cookie cutters, you can top with some shapes – I like the leaves on sale now (!) at Williams-Sonoma. Get ready for the applause!

How to Cook Pasta like a Pro…

Winter is time for heartier foods, like soups, stews, and pasta. We have been watching the Italian pasta experts and have come up with the “how to cook pasta like a pro” tip sheet below. We are not suggesting or giving pointers on how to make homemade kosher pasta as I personally have only tried this once and while the pasta was fresh tasting and doughy, the kitchen was a disaster and the effort not all that appreciated by the family. (For a great recipe based on ready-made gluten-free pasta, check out this recipe for Gluten Free Thai Pasta from The Jewish Hostess.) Many would disagree but I say save the time and make fresh challah and cook dried pasta like a pro for a tasty and easy meal.

• Season the water generously with salt. For each pound of pasta, use 6 quarts water and 3 generous tablespoons of kosher salt. Don’t salt the water until it’s boiling.
• Never boil a sauce until you have added the cooked pasta to the sauce. Reheat it all together.
• Go light on sauce. Heavy sauces are very 2009. The dish will feel lighter, cleaner and more balanced. Use the starchy water that you cook the pasta in to lighten sauces.
• Add fresh herbs after tossing the pasta with the sauce, then add a drizzle of olive oil. Herbs get overcooked and flavorless with too much heat. They add terrific flavor and color to pasta but many people add them too early and kill the herb flavoring.
• Remove the pan of pasta and sauce from the heat before adding the cheese. This prevents the cheese from getting overly stuck together. Adding the cheese at the end gives freshness to the dish, subtle cheese flavor, and helps it melt to the perfect consistency.
• Experiment with different types of cheese like ricotta, Boursin, goat cheese, and even Brie on pasta. They liven up all the ordinary to extraordinary.

Here are a few pasta specialties that are easy to make, really flavorful, and always a big hit.
Easy Lemon Pasta with Grilled Chicken
Spaghetti with Red and Yellow Peppers (And Salmon too, optional)
Angel Hair Pasta with Sun-Dried Tomatoes and Goat Cheese

Spaghetti with Red and Yellow Peppers (and Salmon too, optional)

3 large red bell peppers (or 1 cup cut in strips from a jar)
3 large yellow peppers (or 1 cup cut in strips from a jar)
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
4 large shallots, thinly sliced
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
1 cup dry white wine
2 cups pareve chicken stock or vegetable stock
1 pound spaghetti
½ cup Italian parsley, chopped
½ cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 salmon fillets, cooked and cut into chunks (optional)

To cook salmon, lightly season salmon with salt and pepper, drizzle with olive oil and cook in a 400-degree oven for 15-18 minutes.

Preheat the broiler. Cover a heavy baking sheet wit foil. Arrange the bell peppers on the baking sheet and broil until the skins brown and blister, about 20 minutes. Enclose the peppers in a resealable plastic bag and set aside until cooled to room temperature. Peel and see the cooled peppers and cut them into strips.

Heat the oil in a saucepan. Add the shallots and cook about 3 minutes. Add the pepper strips, salt and pepper and sauté for 5 minute. Add the wine and broth and cook over low heat for 20 minutes or until the peppers are very soft.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Salt the water and add the pasta and cook until tender about 8-10 minutes. Drain.

Add the pasta, parsley, salmon, and cheese to the pepper sauce. Stir to combine and serve.